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Some uses of third-person reference forms in speaker self-reference

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Some uses of third-person reference forms in speaker self-reference. / Land, Vicky; Kitzinger, Celia.

In: Discourse Studies, Vol. 9, No. 4, 08.2007, p. 493-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Land, V & Kitzinger, C 2007, 'Some uses of third-person reference forms in speaker self-reference', Discourse Studies, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 493-525. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461445607079164

APA

Land, V., & Kitzinger, C. (2007). Some uses of third-person reference forms in speaker self-reference. Discourse Studies, 9(4), 493-525. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461445607079164

Vancouver

Land V, Kitzinger C. Some uses of third-person reference forms in speaker self-reference. Discourse Studies. 2007 Aug;9(4):493-525. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461445607079164

Author

Land, Vicky ; Kitzinger, Celia. / Some uses of third-person reference forms in speaker self-reference. In: Discourse Studies. 2007 ; Vol. 9, No. 4. pp. 493-525.

Bibtex - Download

@article{04db4de85b4949ba882181f4ffe0279f,
title = "Some uses of third-person reference forms in speaker self-reference",
abstract = "Speakers of English have available a set of terms dedicated to doing individual self-reference: 'I' and its grammatical variants, 'me', 'my', I mine{"} etc. Speaker selection of other than these dedicated terms may invite special attention for what has prompted their use. This article draws on field recordings of talk-in-interaction in which speakers use 'third-person' reference forms when speaking about themselves (e.g. when a woman says of her husband that 'he's married to an Englishwoman'). We show that third-person forms are recurrently used for representing the views of someone else (a recipient or a non-present person, an indeterminate member of a category of persons, or an organization). We also show how - by drawing on resources such as the distinction between recognitional and non-recognitional person reference forms, and on category bound attributes - the particular third-person term selected can be fitted to and thereby contribute to the action(s) a speaker is implementing through their turn at talk.",
keywords = "conversation, conversation analysis, epistemics, first-person reference, footing, identity, TALK-IN-INTERACTION, CALLS, HOME",
author = "Vicky Land and Celia Kitzinger",
year = "2007",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1177/1461445607079164",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "493--525",
journal = "Discourse Studies",
issn = "1461-4456",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Some uses of third-person reference forms in speaker self-reference

AU - Land, Vicky

AU - Kitzinger, Celia

PY - 2007/8

Y1 - 2007/8

N2 - Speakers of English have available a set of terms dedicated to doing individual self-reference: 'I' and its grammatical variants, 'me', 'my', I mine" etc. Speaker selection of other than these dedicated terms may invite special attention for what has prompted their use. This article draws on field recordings of talk-in-interaction in which speakers use 'third-person' reference forms when speaking about themselves (e.g. when a woman says of her husband that 'he's married to an Englishwoman'). We show that third-person forms are recurrently used for representing the views of someone else (a recipient or a non-present person, an indeterminate member of a category of persons, or an organization). We also show how - by drawing on resources such as the distinction between recognitional and non-recognitional person reference forms, and on category bound attributes - the particular third-person term selected can be fitted to and thereby contribute to the action(s) a speaker is implementing through their turn at talk.

AB - Speakers of English have available a set of terms dedicated to doing individual self-reference: 'I' and its grammatical variants, 'me', 'my', I mine" etc. Speaker selection of other than these dedicated terms may invite special attention for what has prompted their use. This article draws on field recordings of talk-in-interaction in which speakers use 'third-person' reference forms when speaking about themselves (e.g. when a woman says of her husband that 'he's married to an Englishwoman'). We show that third-person forms are recurrently used for representing the views of someone else (a recipient or a non-present person, an indeterminate member of a category of persons, or an organization). We also show how - by drawing on resources such as the distinction between recognitional and non-recognitional person reference forms, and on category bound attributes - the particular third-person term selected can be fitted to and thereby contribute to the action(s) a speaker is implementing through their turn at talk.

KW - conversation

KW - conversation analysis

KW - epistemics

KW - first-person reference

KW - footing

KW - identity

KW - TALK-IN-INTERACTION

KW - CALLS

KW - HOME

U2 - 10.1177/1461445607079164

DO - 10.1177/1461445607079164

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 493

EP - 525

JO - Discourse Studies

JF - Discourse Studies

SN - 1461-4456

IS - 4

ER -