By the same authors

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From the same journal

Something to declare? The disclosure of common mental health problems at work

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Something to declare? The disclosure of common mental health problems at work. / Irvine, A.

In: Disability & Society, Vol. 26, No. 2, 03.2011, p. 179-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Irvine, A 2011, 'Something to declare? The disclosure of common mental health problems at work', Disability & Society, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 179-192. https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2011.544058

APA

Irvine, A. (2011). Something to declare? The disclosure of common mental health problems at work. Disability & Society, 26(2), 179-192. https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2011.544058

Vancouver

Irvine A. Something to declare? The disclosure of common mental health problems at work. Disability & Society. 2011 Mar;26(2):179-192. https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2011.544058

Author

Irvine, A. / Something to declare? The disclosure of common mental health problems at work. In: Disability & Society. 2011 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 179-192.

Bibtex - Download

@article{dcab19f1955a4975ab7910a9f06a63d0,
title = "Something to declare?: The disclosure of common mental health problems at work",
abstract = "This article presents research findings that suggest there is a further dimension to be added to existing understandings of workplace disclosure of common mental health problems. Experiences of participants in two recent studies on mental health and employment illustrated that, firstly, while people may talk to their employer about emotional distress in general terms, they do not necessarily discuss the effects on their mental health in medicalised language. Secondly, people may not mention anything at all because they do not perceive what they are experiencing as a 'mental health' issue that might warrant the involvement of their employer. These findings raise questions about conceptualisations of mental health. The article suggests that an enhanced focus in public and policy discourse on concepts of mental well-being and positive mental health, as matters of universal relevance, may lead to earlier recognition of and better support for common mental health problems at work.",
keywords = "employment/benefits, ill/disabled adults",
author = "A Irvine",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1080/09687599.2011.544058",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "179--192",
journal = "Disability & Society",
issn = "0968-7599",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Something to declare?

T2 - Disability & Society

AU - Irvine, A

PY - 2011/3

Y1 - 2011/3

N2 - This article presents research findings that suggest there is a further dimension to be added to existing understandings of workplace disclosure of common mental health problems. Experiences of participants in two recent studies on mental health and employment illustrated that, firstly, while people may talk to their employer about emotional distress in general terms, they do not necessarily discuss the effects on their mental health in medicalised language. Secondly, people may not mention anything at all because they do not perceive what they are experiencing as a 'mental health' issue that might warrant the involvement of their employer. These findings raise questions about conceptualisations of mental health. The article suggests that an enhanced focus in public and policy discourse on concepts of mental well-being and positive mental health, as matters of universal relevance, may lead to earlier recognition of and better support for common mental health problems at work.

AB - This article presents research findings that suggest there is a further dimension to be added to existing understandings of workplace disclosure of common mental health problems. Experiences of participants in two recent studies on mental health and employment illustrated that, firstly, while people may talk to their employer about emotional distress in general terms, they do not necessarily discuss the effects on their mental health in medicalised language. Secondly, people may not mention anything at all because they do not perceive what they are experiencing as a 'mental health' issue that might warrant the involvement of their employer. These findings raise questions about conceptualisations of mental health. The article suggests that an enhanced focus in public and policy discourse on concepts of mental well-being and positive mental health, as matters of universal relevance, may lead to earlier recognition of and better support for common mental health problems at work.

KW - employment/benefits

KW - ill/disabled adults

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952000674&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09687599.2011.544058

DO - 10.1080/09687599.2011.544058

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 179

EP - 192

JO - Disability & Society

JF - Disability & Society

SN - 0968-7599

IS - 2

ER -