From the same journal

From the same journal

Speed Up or Slow Down? Social Theory in the Information Age

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Speed Up or Slow Down? Social Theory in the Information Age. / Gane, N.

In: Information, Communication and Society, Vol. 9, No. 1, 02.2006, p. 20-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Gane, N 2006, 'Speed Up or Slow Down? Social Theory in the Information Age', Information, Communication and Society, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 20-38. https://doi.org/10.1080/13691180500519282

APA

Gane, N. (2006). Speed Up or Slow Down? Social Theory in the Information Age. Information, Communication and Society, 9(1), 20-38. https://doi.org/10.1080/13691180500519282

Vancouver

Gane N. Speed Up or Slow Down? Social Theory in the Information Age. Information, Communication and Society. 2006 Feb;9(1):20-38. https://doi.org/10.1080/13691180500519282

Author

Gane, N. / Speed Up or Slow Down? Social Theory in the Information Age. In: Information, Communication and Society. 2006 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 20-38.

Bibtex - Download

@article{01d3139932434e9eb670cc1ea3636e7d,
title = "Speed Up or Slow Down? Social Theory in the Information Age",
abstract = "Extreme processes of social and cultural acceleration lie at the heart of the information age but social theory, for the most part, continues to be a slow and patient affair. In view of this, this paper asks how such theory is to respond to the speed-up of social life and culture. Should it attempt to keep pace with a world that is changing faster than ever? Or is the strength of theory that it is a slow, detached and reflective form that lies outside the accelerated logic of contemporary capitalist culture? In an attempt to address such questions, this paper considers two main alternatives: first, that theory should follow the speed-up of the world by technologizing itself (as argued by Scott Lash and Peter Lunenfeld), and second, and seemingly contrary to this, that in times of cultural speed-up theory should either call for social and cultural slow-down (Marshall McLuhan, Paul Virilio), slow down itself (Jean Baudrillard), or perhaps both. In considering these alternatives, media theory (associated with the above figures) is used as a resource for questioning the focus and form of social theory today.",
author = "N. Gane",
year = "2006",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1080/13691180500519282",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "20--38",
journal = "Information, Communication and Society",
issn = "1369-118X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Speed Up or Slow Down? Social Theory in the Information Age

AU - Gane, N.

PY - 2006/2

Y1 - 2006/2

N2 - Extreme processes of social and cultural acceleration lie at the heart of the information age but social theory, for the most part, continues to be a slow and patient affair. In view of this, this paper asks how such theory is to respond to the speed-up of social life and culture. Should it attempt to keep pace with a world that is changing faster than ever? Or is the strength of theory that it is a slow, detached and reflective form that lies outside the accelerated logic of contemporary capitalist culture? In an attempt to address such questions, this paper considers two main alternatives: first, that theory should follow the speed-up of the world by technologizing itself (as argued by Scott Lash and Peter Lunenfeld), and second, and seemingly contrary to this, that in times of cultural speed-up theory should either call for social and cultural slow-down (Marshall McLuhan, Paul Virilio), slow down itself (Jean Baudrillard), or perhaps both. In considering these alternatives, media theory (associated with the above figures) is used as a resource for questioning the focus and form of social theory today.

AB - Extreme processes of social and cultural acceleration lie at the heart of the information age but social theory, for the most part, continues to be a slow and patient affair. In view of this, this paper asks how such theory is to respond to the speed-up of social life and culture. Should it attempt to keep pace with a world that is changing faster than ever? Or is the strength of theory that it is a slow, detached and reflective form that lies outside the accelerated logic of contemporary capitalist culture? In an attempt to address such questions, this paper considers two main alternatives: first, that theory should follow the speed-up of the world by technologizing itself (as argued by Scott Lash and Peter Lunenfeld), and second, and seemingly contrary to this, that in times of cultural speed-up theory should either call for social and cultural slow-down (Marshall McLuhan, Paul Virilio), slow down itself (Jean Baudrillard), or perhaps both. In considering these alternatives, media theory (associated with the above figures) is used as a resource for questioning the focus and form of social theory today.

U2 - 10.1080/13691180500519282

DO - 10.1080/13691180500519282

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 20

EP - 38

JO - Information, Communication and Society

JF - Information, Communication and Society

SN - 1369-118X

IS - 1

ER -