By the same authors

Success in a knowledge economy? Understanding the early labour market experiences of doctoral graduates in the UK

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Success in a knowledge economy? Understanding the early labour market experiences of doctoral graduates in the UK. / Hancock, Sally Elizabeth.

2017. Paper presented at Society for Research into Higher Education Annual Research Conference, .

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Harvard

Hancock, SE 2017, 'Success in a knowledge economy? Understanding the early labour market experiences of doctoral graduates in the UK', Paper presented at Society for Research into Higher Education Annual Research Conference, 6/12/17 - 8/12/17.

APA

Hancock, S. E. (2017). Success in a knowledge economy? Understanding the early labour market experiences of doctoral graduates in the UK. Paper presented at Society for Research into Higher Education Annual Research Conference, .

Vancouver

Hancock SE. Success in a knowledge economy? Understanding the early labour market experiences of doctoral graduates in the UK. 2017. Paper presented at Society for Research into Higher Education Annual Research Conference, .

Author

Hancock, Sally Elizabeth. / Success in a knowledge economy? Understanding the early labour market experiences of doctoral graduates in the UK. Paper presented at Society for Research into Higher Education Annual Research Conference, .

Bibtex - Download

@conference{c7a1b9f770324195835f24fdac9226b5,
title = "Success in a knowledge economy? Understanding the early labour market experiences of doctoral graduates in the UK",
abstract = "For several decades, the policy discourse of the knowledge economy has articulated the importance of doctoral graduates to economic growth. More recently, a counter narrative depicting doctoral graduates as {\textquoteleft}disillusioned and directionless{\textquoteright} - facing difficult and fractured transitions into non-academic employment - has emerged. This study offers a timely reappraisal of the knowledge economy promise, analysing recent employment data for UK doctoral graduates (n=4731) linked to academic and socio-demographic data. This novel element of linked data enables an exploration of whether and how doctoral students{\textquoteright} academic experiences and differing access to economic, social and cultural capitals are associated with distinct career pathways. Early analyses indicate that the vast majority of doctoral graduates are in professional employment, and career satisfaction is high. However, clear associations are observed between socio-demographic characteristics and doctoral subject and institution, and employment outcomes differ significantly by these variables, too. A full analysis, with policy recommendations, will be presented.",
author = "Hancock, {Sally Elizabeth}",
year = "2017",
month = dec,
language = "English",
note = "Society for Research into Higher Education Annual Research Conference ; Conference date: 06-12-2017 Through 08-12-2017",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CONF

T1 - Success in a knowledge economy? Understanding the early labour market experiences of doctoral graduates in the UK

AU - Hancock, Sally Elizabeth

PY - 2017/12

Y1 - 2017/12

N2 - For several decades, the policy discourse of the knowledge economy has articulated the importance of doctoral graduates to economic growth. More recently, a counter narrative depicting doctoral graduates as ‘disillusioned and directionless’ - facing difficult and fractured transitions into non-academic employment - has emerged. This study offers a timely reappraisal of the knowledge economy promise, analysing recent employment data for UK doctoral graduates (n=4731) linked to academic and socio-demographic data. This novel element of linked data enables an exploration of whether and how doctoral students’ academic experiences and differing access to economic, social and cultural capitals are associated with distinct career pathways. Early analyses indicate that the vast majority of doctoral graduates are in professional employment, and career satisfaction is high. However, clear associations are observed between socio-demographic characteristics and doctoral subject and institution, and employment outcomes differ significantly by these variables, too. A full analysis, with policy recommendations, will be presented.

AB - For several decades, the policy discourse of the knowledge economy has articulated the importance of doctoral graduates to economic growth. More recently, a counter narrative depicting doctoral graduates as ‘disillusioned and directionless’ - facing difficult and fractured transitions into non-academic employment - has emerged. This study offers a timely reappraisal of the knowledge economy promise, analysing recent employment data for UK doctoral graduates (n=4731) linked to academic and socio-demographic data. This novel element of linked data enables an exploration of whether and how doctoral students’ academic experiences and differing access to economic, social and cultural capitals are associated with distinct career pathways. Early analyses indicate that the vast majority of doctoral graduates are in professional employment, and career satisfaction is high. However, clear associations are observed between socio-demographic characteristics and doctoral subject and institution, and employment outcomes differ significantly by these variables, too. A full analysis, with policy recommendations, will be presented.

M3 - Paper

T2 - Society for Research into Higher Education Annual Research Conference

Y2 - 6 December 2017 through 8 December 2017

ER -