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From the same journal

Switching between science and culture in transpecies transplantation

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Switching between science and culture in transpecies transplantation. / Brown, N; Michael, M.

In: Science, Technology and Human Values, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2001, p. 322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Brown, N & Michael, M 2001, 'Switching between science and culture in transpecies transplantation', Science, Technology and Human Values, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 322.

APA

Brown, N., & Michael, M. (2001). Switching between science and culture in transpecies transplantation. Science, Technology and Human Values, 26(1), 322.

Vancouver

Brown N, Michael M. Switching between science and culture in transpecies transplantation. Science, Technology and Human Values. 2001;26(1):322.

Author

Brown, N ; Michael, M. / Switching between science and culture in transpecies transplantation. In: Science, Technology and Human Values. 2001 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 322.

Bibtex - Download

@article{a6026e580e2240348866e5aeb9e0f65b,
title = "Switching between science and culture in transpecies transplantation",
abstract = "This article discusses xenotransplantation (XTP: the surgical use of nonhuman tissues, organs, and cells for human transplantation) and examines the way its scientific promoters have defended their technology against potentially damaging public representations. The authors explore the criteria used to legitimate the selection of the pig as the best species from which to {"}harvest{"} transplant tissues in the future. The authors' analysis shows that scientists and medical practitioners routinely switch between scientific and cultural repertoires. These repertoires enable such actors to exchange expert identities in scientific discourse for public identities in cultural discourse. These discourses map onto similarities and differences between animal donors and human hosts. Finally, the case is used to comment on a number of related approaches where the dynamics of medical and scientific authority are discussed.",
keywords = "MEDICINE",
author = "N Brown and M Michael",
year = "2001",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "322",
journal = "Science, Technology and Human Values",
issn = "0162-2439",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Switching between science and culture in transpecies transplantation

AU - Brown, N

AU - Michael, M

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - This article discusses xenotransplantation (XTP: the surgical use of nonhuman tissues, organs, and cells for human transplantation) and examines the way its scientific promoters have defended their technology against potentially damaging public representations. The authors explore the criteria used to legitimate the selection of the pig as the best species from which to "harvest" transplant tissues in the future. The authors' analysis shows that scientists and medical practitioners routinely switch between scientific and cultural repertoires. These repertoires enable such actors to exchange expert identities in scientific discourse for public identities in cultural discourse. These discourses map onto similarities and differences between animal donors and human hosts. Finally, the case is used to comment on a number of related approaches where the dynamics of medical and scientific authority are discussed.

AB - This article discusses xenotransplantation (XTP: the surgical use of nonhuman tissues, organs, and cells for human transplantation) and examines the way its scientific promoters have defended their technology against potentially damaging public representations. The authors explore the criteria used to legitimate the selection of the pig as the best species from which to "harvest" transplant tissues in the future. The authors' analysis shows that scientists and medical practitioners routinely switch between scientific and cultural repertoires. These repertoires enable such actors to exchange expert identities in scientific discourse for public identities in cultural discourse. These discourses map onto similarities and differences between animal donors and human hosts. Finally, the case is used to comment on a number of related approaches where the dynamics of medical and scientific authority are discussed.

KW - MEDICINE

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 322

JO - Science, Technology and Human Values

JF - Science, Technology and Human Values

SN - 0162-2439

IS - 1

ER -