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Taking one for the team: Partisan alignment and planning outcomes in England

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Taking one for the team : Partisan alignment and planning outcomes in England. / Clegg, Liam Simon.

In: British Journal of Politics and International Relations, 25.11.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Clegg, LS 2020, 'Taking one for the team: Partisan alignment and planning outcomes in England', British Journal of Politics and International Relations.

APA

Clegg, L. S. (Accepted/In press). Taking one for the team: Partisan alignment and planning outcomes in England. British Journal of Politics and International Relations.

Vancouver

Clegg LS. Taking one for the team: Partisan alignment and planning outcomes in England. British Journal of Politics and International Relations. 2020 Nov 25.

Author

Clegg, Liam Simon. / Taking one for the team : Partisan alignment and planning outcomes in England. In: British Journal of Politics and International Relations. 2020.

Bibtex - Download

@article{1006ad7f937546ba97cc885bdfb356ba,
title = "Taking one for the team: Partisan alignment and planning outcomes in England",
abstract = "Does partisan alignment affect sub-national political units{\textquoteright} performance? When testing for a partisan alignment effect local authority planning processes represent a {\textquoteleft}hard case{\textquoteright}, given procedural insulation against politicisation, and a disjuncture between national party commitments to expand house-building versus pressure on local councillors from residents opposing new developments. I find that, in general, partisan alignment brings an increased propensity to approve large residential planning applications. This suggests councillors{\textquoteright} willingness to {\textquoteleft}take one for the team{\textquoteright} by prioritising national over local interests. Consistent with {\textquoteleft}party politics of housing{\textquoteright} insights, inter-party variation sees an altered effect in left-wing constellations, which display lowered approval propensities. In addition to these substantive extensions to scholarship on partisan alignment effects, the insights presented into the drivers of variation in local authority planning outcomes contribute to the pressing tasks of understanding and addressing the chronic under-supply of new housing within the English housing system. ",
author = "Clegg, {Liam Simon}",
note = "This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher{\textquoteright}s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "25",
language = "English",
journal = "British Journal of Politics and International Relations",
issn = "1369-1481",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Taking one for the team

T2 - Partisan alignment and planning outcomes in England

AU - Clegg, Liam Simon

N1 - This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.

PY - 2020/11/25

Y1 - 2020/11/25

N2 - Does partisan alignment affect sub-national political units’ performance? When testing for a partisan alignment effect local authority planning processes represent a ‘hard case’, given procedural insulation against politicisation, and a disjuncture between national party commitments to expand house-building versus pressure on local councillors from residents opposing new developments. I find that, in general, partisan alignment brings an increased propensity to approve large residential planning applications. This suggests councillors’ willingness to ‘take one for the team’ by prioritising national over local interests. Consistent with ‘party politics of housing’ insights, inter-party variation sees an altered effect in left-wing constellations, which display lowered approval propensities. In addition to these substantive extensions to scholarship on partisan alignment effects, the insights presented into the drivers of variation in local authority planning outcomes contribute to the pressing tasks of understanding and addressing the chronic under-supply of new housing within the English housing system.

AB - Does partisan alignment affect sub-national political units’ performance? When testing for a partisan alignment effect local authority planning processes represent a ‘hard case’, given procedural insulation against politicisation, and a disjuncture between national party commitments to expand house-building versus pressure on local councillors from residents opposing new developments. I find that, in general, partisan alignment brings an increased propensity to approve large residential planning applications. This suggests councillors’ willingness to ‘take one for the team’ by prioritising national over local interests. Consistent with ‘party politics of housing’ insights, inter-party variation sees an altered effect in left-wing constellations, which display lowered approval propensities. In addition to these substantive extensions to scholarship on partisan alignment effects, the insights presented into the drivers of variation in local authority planning outcomes contribute to the pressing tasks of understanding and addressing the chronic under-supply of new housing within the English housing system.

M3 - Article

JO - British Journal of Politics and International Relations

JF - British Journal of Politics and International Relations

SN - 1369-1481

ER -