Teachers' attitudes towards integration/inclusion: A review of the literature

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Teachers' attitudes towards integration/inclusion: A review of the literature. / Norwich, B.; Avramidis, E.

In: European Journal of Special Needs Education, Vol. 17, No. 2, 06.2002, p. 129-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Norwich, B & Avramidis, E 2002, 'Teachers' attitudes towards integration/inclusion: A review of the literature', European Journal of Special Needs Education, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 129-147. https://doi.org/10.1080/08856250210129056

APA

Norwich, B., & Avramidis, E. (2002). Teachers' attitudes towards integration/inclusion: A review of the literature. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 17(2), 129-147. https://doi.org/10.1080/08856250210129056

Vancouver

Norwich B, Avramidis E. Teachers' attitudes towards integration/inclusion: A review of the literature. European Journal of Special Needs Education. 2002 Jun;17(2):129-147. https://doi.org/10.1080/08856250210129056

Author

Norwich, B. ; Avramidis, E. / Teachers' attitudes towards integration/inclusion: A review of the literature. In: European Journal of Special Needs Education. 2002 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 129-147.

Bibtex - Download

@article{9c886fa2782e480186a01d53e0e31a6d,
title = "Teachers' attitudes towards integration/inclusion: A review of the literature",
abstract = "On the assumption that the successful implementation of any inclusive policy is largely dependent on educators being positive about it, a great deal of research has sought to examine teachers' attitudes towards the integration and, more recently, the inclusion of children with special educational needs in the mainstream school. This paper reviews this large body of research and, in so doing, explores a host of factors that might impact upon teacher acceptance of the inclusion principle. The analyses showed evidence of positive attitudes, but no evidence of acceptance of a total inclusion or 'zero reject' approach to special educational provision. Teachers' attitudes were found to be strongly influenced by the nature and severity of the disabling condition presented to them (child-related variables) and less by teacher-related variables. Further, educational environment-related variables, such as the availability of physical and human support, were consistently found to be associated with attitudes to inclusion. After a brief discussion of critical methodological issues germane to the research findings, the paper provides directions for future research based on alternative methodologies.",
author = "B. Norwich and E. Avramidis",
year = "2002",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1080/08856250210129056",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "129--147",
journal = "European Journal of Special Needs Education",
issn = "0885-6257",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Teachers' attitudes towards integration/inclusion: A review of the literature

AU - Norwich, B.

AU - Avramidis, E.

PY - 2002/6

Y1 - 2002/6

N2 - On the assumption that the successful implementation of any inclusive policy is largely dependent on educators being positive about it, a great deal of research has sought to examine teachers' attitudes towards the integration and, more recently, the inclusion of children with special educational needs in the mainstream school. This paper reviews this large body of research and, in so doing, explores a host of factors that might impact upon teacher acceptance of the inclusion principle. The analyses showed evidence of positive attitudes, but no evidence of acceptance of a total inclusion or 'zero reject' approach to special educational provision. Teachers' attitudes were found to be strongly influenced by the nature and severity of the disabling condition presented to them (child-related variables) and less by teacher-related variables. Further, educational environment-related variables, such as the availability of physical and human support, were consistently found to be associated with attitudes to inclusion. After a brief discussion of critical methodological issues germane to the research findings, the paper provides directions for future research based on alternative methodologies.

AB - On the assumption that the successful implementation of any inclusive policy is largely dependent on educators being positive about it, a great deal of research has sought to examine teachers' attitudes towards the integration and, more recently, the inclusion of children with special educational needs in the mainstream school. This paper reviews this large body of research and, in so doing, explores a host of factors that might impact upon teacher acceptance of the inclusion principle. The analyses showed evidence of positive attitudes, but no evidence of acceptance of a total inclusion or 'zero reject' approach to special educational provision. Teachers' attitudes were found to be strongly influenced by the nature and severity of the disabling condition presented to them (child-related variables) and less by teacher-related variables. Further, educational environment-related variables, such as the availability of physical and human support, were consistently found to be associated with attitudes to inclusion. After a brief discussion of critical methodological issues germane to the research findings, the paper provides directions for future research based on alternative methodologies.

U2 - 10.1080/08856250210129056

DO - 10.1080/08856250210129056

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 129

EP - 147

JO - European Journal of Special Needs Education

JF - European Journal of Special Needs Education

SN - 0885-6257

IS - 2

ER -