By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Technology, evidence and professional practice: reflections on the Integrated Children's System

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Technology, evidence and professional practice : reflections on the Integrated Children's System. / Shaw, Ian; Clayden, Jasmine.

In: Journal of Children's Services, Vol. 4, No. 4, 01.12.2009, p. 15-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Shaw, I & Clayden, J 2009, 'Technology, evidence and professional practice: reflections on the Integrated Children's System', Journal of Children's Services, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 15-27. https://doi.org/10.5042/jcs.2010.0018

APA

Shaw, I., & Clayden, J. (2009). Technology, evidence and professional practice: reflections on the Integrated Children's System. Journal of Children's Services, 4(4), 15-27. https://doi.org/10.5042/jcs.2010.0018

Vancouver

Shaw I, Clayden J. Technology, evidence and professional practice: reflections on the Integrated Children's System. Journal of Children's Services. 2009 Dec 1;4(4):15-27. https://doi.org/10.5042/jcs.2010.0018

Author

Shaw, Ian ; Clayden, Jasmine. / Technology, evidence and professional practice : reflections on the Integrated Children's System. In: Journal of Children's Services. 2009 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 15-27.

Bibtex - Download

@article{6eee0cbdf0f64e22be9c837492a10e48,
title = "Technology, evidence and professional practice: reflections on the Integrated Children's System",
abstract = "Through the results from part of a formative evaluation in England and Wales of the Integrated Children's System, the authors aim to illustrate the diverse ways in which policy, technology and practice interests challenge conventional assumptions regarding the construction and use of evidence in children's services. We identify four connected consequences of the ICS for practice. The ICS actively shapes practice, brings issues into focus, renders social work visible and distances the services user. We interpret the findings in terms of the persistence and diversification of professional discretion and the interplay of standardisation and case-based practice. We challenge some accepted academic understandings of the relationship between technology and professional practice.",
author = "Ian Shaw and Jasmine Clayden",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "http://dx.doi.org/10.5042/jcs.2010.0018",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "15--27",
journal = "Journal of Children's Services",
issn = "1746-6660",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Technology, evidence and professional practice

T2 - reflections on the Integrated Children's System

AU - Shaw, Ian

AU - Clayden, Jasmine

PY - 2009/12/1

Y1 - 2009/12/1

N2 - Through the results from part of a formative evaluation in England and Wales of the Integrated Children's System, the authors aim to illustrate the diverse ways in which policy, technology and practice interests challenge conventional assumptions regarding the construction and use of evidence in children's services. We identify four connected consequences of the ICS for practice. The ICS actively shapes practice, brings issues into focus, renders social work visible and distances the services user. We interpret the findings in terms of the persistence and diversification of professional discretion and the interplay of standardisation and case-based practice. We challenge some accepted academic understandings of the relationship between technology and professional practice.

AB - Through the results from part of a formative evaluation in England and Wales of the Integrated Children's System, the authors aim to illustrate the diverse ways in which policy, technology and practice interests challenge conventional assumptions regarding the construction and use of evidence in children's services. We identify four connected consequences of the ICS for practice. The ICS actively shapes practice, brings issues into focus, renders social work visible and distances the services user. We interpret the findings in terms of the persistence and diversification of professional discretion and the interplay of standardisation and case-based practice. We challenge some accepted academic understandings of the relationship between technology and professional practice.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77953558229&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.5042/jcs.2010.0018

DO - http://dx.doi.org/10.5042/jcs.2010.0018

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 15

EP - 27

JO - Journal of Children's Services

JF - Journal of Children's Services

SN - 1746-6660

IS - 4

ER -