By the same authors

From the same journal

Telematic performance and the challenge of latency

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Telematic performance and the challenge of latency. / Rofe, Michael ; Reuben, Federico.

In: The Journal of Music, Technology and Education, Vol. 10, No. 2-3, 01.12.2017, p. 167–183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Rofe, M & Reuben, F 2017, 'Telematic performance and the challenge of latency', The Journal of Music, Technology and Education, vol. 10, no. 2-3, pp. 167–183. https://doi.org/10.1386/jmte.10.2-3.167_1

APA

Rofe, M., & Reuben, F. (2017). Telematic performance and the challenge of latency. The Journal of Music, Technology and Education, 10(2-3), 167–183. https://doi.org/10.1386/jmte.10.2-3.167_1

Vancouver

Rofe M, Reuben F. Telematic performance and the challenge of latency. The Journal of Music, Technology and Education. 2017 Dec 1;10(2-3):167–183. https://doi.org/10.1386/jmte.10.2-3.167_1

Author

Rofe, Michael ; Reuben, Federico. / Telematic performance and the challenge of latency. In: The Journal of Music, Technology and Education. 2017 ; Vol. 10, No. 2-3. pp. 167–183.

Bibtex - Download

@article{6cc97257557a444ea4de3571e11afdd4,
title = "Telematic performance and the challenge of latency",
abstract = "Any attempt to perform music over a network requires engagement with the issue of latency. Either latency needs to be reduced to the point where it is no longer noticeable or creative alternatives to working with latency need to be developed. Given that Online Orchestra aimed to enable performance in community contexts, where significant bandwidth and specialist equipment were not available, it would not be possible to reduce latency below the 20–30ms cut-off at which it becomes noticeable. Instead, Online Orchestra developed new software that controls network latency, locking it to musical tempo. This in turn enabled musicians to perform precise rhythmic music in a latency-rich environment.",
author = "Michael Rofe and Federico Reuben",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2017 Ingenta. Article copyright remains with the publisher, society or author(s) as specified within the article. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher{\textquoteright}s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.",
year = "2017",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1386/jmte.10.2-3.167_1",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "167–183",
journal = "The Journal of Music, Technology and Education",
issn = "1752-7066",
publisher = "Intellect Publishers",
number = "2-3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Telematic performance and the challenge of latency

AU - Rofe, Michael

AU - Reuben, Federico

N1 - © 2017 Ingenta. Article copyright remains with the publisher, society or author(s) as specified within the article. This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Any attempt to perform music over a network requires engagement with the issue of latency. Either latency needs to be reduced to the point where it is no longer noticeable or creative alternatives to working with latency need to be developed. Given that Online Orchestra aimed to enable performance in community contexts, where significant bandwidth and specialist equipment were not available, it would not be possible to reduce latency below the 20–30ms cut-off at which it becomes noticeable. Instead, Online Orchestra developed new software that controls network latency, locking it to musical tempo. This in turn enabled musicians to perform precise rhythmic music in a latency-rich environment.

AB - Any attempt to perform music over a network requires engagement with the issue of latency. Either latency needs to be reduced to the point where it is no longer noticeable or creative alternatives to working with latency need to be developed. Given that Online Orchestra aimed to enable performance in community contexts, where significant bandwidth and specialist equipment were not available, it would not be possible to reduce latency below the 20–30ms cut-off at which it becomes noticeable. Instead, Online Orchestra developed new software that controls network latency, locking it to musical tempo. This in turn enabled musicians to perform precise rhythmic music in a latency-rich environment.

U2 - 10.1386/jmte.10.2-3.167_1

DO - 10.1386/jmte.10.2-3.167_1

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 167

EP - 183

JO - The Journal of Music, Technology and Education

JF - The Journal of Music, Technology and Education

SN - 1752-7066

IS - 2-3

ER -