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The Benefits of Targeted Memory Reactivation for Consolidation in Sleep Are Contingent on Memory Accuracy and Direct Cue-Memory Associations: Sleep and Memory Reactivation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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The Benefits of Targeted Memory Reactivation for Consolidation in Sleep Are Contingent on Memory Accuracy and Direct Cue-Memory Associations : Sleep and Memory Reactivation. / Cairney, Scott Ashley; Lindsay, Shane; Sobczak, Justyna Maria; Paller, Ken A.; Gaskell, Gareth.

In: Sleep, 01.02.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Cairney, SA, Lindsay, S, Sobczak, JM, Paller, KA & Gaskell, G 2016, 'The Benefits of Targeted Memory Reactivation for Consolidation in Sleep Are Contingent on Memory Accuracy and Direct Cue-Memory Associations: Sleep and Memory Reactivation', Sleep.

APA

Cairney, S. A., Lindsay, S., Sobczak, J. M., Paller, K. A., & Gaskell, G. (2016). The Benefits of Targeted Memory Reactivation for Consolidation in Sleep Are Contingent on Memory Accuracy and Direct Cue-Memory Associations: Sleep and Memory Reactivation. Sleep, [00533-15].

Vancouver

Cairney SA, Lindsay S, Sobczak JM, Paller KA, Gaskell G. The Benefits of Targeted Memory Reactivation for Consolidation in Sleep Are Contingent on Memory Accuracy and Direct Cue-Memory Associations: Sleep and Memory Reactivation. Sleep. 2016 Feb 1. 00533-15.

Author

Cairney, Scott Ashley ; Lindsay, Shane ; Sobczak, Justyna Maria ; Paller, Ken A. ; Gaskell, Gareth. / The Benefits of Targeted Memory Reactivation for Consolidation in Sleep Are Contingent on Memory Accuracy and Direct Cue-Memory Associations : Sleep and Memory Reactivation. In: Sleep. 2016.

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@article{ce4f57bb42f54ff39f5f534375810231,
title = "The Benefits of Targeted Memory Reactivation for Consolidation in Sleep Are Contingent on Memory Accuracy and Direct Cue-Memory Associations: Sleep and Memory Reactivation",
abstract = "Study Objectives: To investigate how the effects of targeted memory reactivation (TMR) are influenced by memory accuracy prior to sleep and the presence or absence of direct cue-memory associations.Design: Fifty pictures were each associated with an unrelated word and then with a screen location in two separate tasks. During picture-location training, each picture was also presented with a semantically related sound. The sounds were therefore directly associated with the picture locations but indirectly associated with the words. During a subsequent nap, half of the sounds were replayed in SWS (TMR). The impact of TMR on memory for the picture locations (direct cue-memory associations) and picture-word pairs (indirect cue-memory associations) was then examined. Setting: Sleep, Language and Memory Laboratory, University of York, UK.Participants: 30 adults; 14 male (mean ± SD age, 19.87 ± 1.94 years).Interventions: TMR in SWS.Measurements and Results: TMR reduced overall memory decay for recall of picture locations. Further analyses revealed a benefit of TMR for picture locations recalled with a low degree of accuracy prior to sleep, but not those recalled with a high degree of accuracy. The benefit of TMR for low accuracy memories was predicted by time spent in SWS. There was no benefit of TMR for memory of the picture-word pairs, irrespective of memory accuracy prior to sleep. Conclusions: TMR provides the greatest benefit to memories recalled with a low degree of accuracy prior to sleep. The memory benefits of TMR may also be contingent on direct cue-memory associations. ",
keywords = "Memory, Reactivation, Consolidation, Slow-wave sleep",
author = "Cairney, {Scott Ashley} and Shane Lindsay and Sobczak, {Justyna Maria} and Paller, {Ken A.} and Gareth Gaskell",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies. Date of Acceptance: 12/01/2016 ",
year = "2016",
month = feb,
day = "1",
language = "English",
journal = "Sleep",
issn = "0161-8105",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Benefits of Targeted Memory Reactivation for Consolidation in Sleep Are Contingent on Memory Accuracy and Direct Cue-Memory Associations

T2 - Sleep and Memory Reactivation

AU - Cairney, Scott Ashley

AU - Lindsay, Shane

AU - Sobczak, Justyna Maria

AU - Paller, Ken A.

AU - Gaskell, Gareth

N1 - © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies. Date of Acceptance: 12/01/2016

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - Study Objectives: To investigate how the effects of targeted memory reactivation (TMR) are influenced by memory accuracy prior to sleep and the presence or absence of direct cue-memory associations.Design: Fifty pictures were each associated with an unrelated word and then with a screen location in two separate tasks. During picture-location training, each picture was also presented with a semantically related sound. The sounds were therefore directly associated with the picture locations but indirectly associated with the words. During a subsequent nap, half of the sounds were replayed in SWS (TMR). The impact of TMR on memory for the picture locations (direct cue-memory associations) and picture-word pairs (indirect cue-memory associations) was then examined. Setting: Sleep, Language and Memory Laboratory, University of York, UK.Participants: 30 adults; 14 male (mean ± SD age, 19.87 ± 1.94 years).Interventions: TMR in SWS.Measurements and Results: TMR reduced overall memory decay for recall of picture locations. Further analyses revealed a benefit of TMR for picture locations recalled with a low degree of accuracy prior to sleep, but not those recalled with a high degree of accuracy. The benefit of TMR for low accuracy memories was predicted by time spent in SWS. There was no benefit of TMR for memory of the picture-word pairs, irrespective of memory accuracy prior to sleep. Conclusions: TMR provides the greatest benefit to memories recalled with a low degree of accuracy prior to sleep. The memory benefits of TMR may also be contingent on direct cue-memory associations.

AB - Study Objectives: To investigate how the effects of targeted memory reactivation (TMR) are influenced by memory accuracy prior to sleep and the presence or absence of direct cue-memory associations.Design: Fifty pictures were each associated with an unrelated word and then with a screen location in two separate tasks. During picture-location training, each picture was also presented with a semantically related sound. The sounds were therefore directly associated with the picture locations but indirectly associated with the words. During a subsequent nap, half of the sounds were replayed in SWS (TMR). The impact of TMR on memory for the picture locations (direct cue-memory associations) and picture-word pairs (indirect cue-memory associations) was then examined. Setting: Sleep, Language and Memory Laboratory, University of York, UK.Participants: 30 adults; 14 male (mean ± SD age, 19.87 ± 1.94 years).Interventions: TMR in SWS.Measurements and Results: TMR reduced overall memory decay for recall of picture locations. Further analyses revealed a benefit of TMR for picture locations recalled with a low degree of accuracy prior to sleep, but not those recalled with a high degree of accuracy. The benefit of TMR for low accuracy memories was predicted by time spent in SWS. There was no benefit of TMR for memory of the picture-word pairs, irrespective of memory accuracy prior to sleep. Conclusions: TMR provides the greatest benefit to memories recalled with a low degree of accuracy prior to sleep. The memory benefits of TMR may also be contingent on direct cue-memory associations.

KW - Memory

KW - Reactivation

KW - Consolidation

KW - Slow-wave sleep

M3 - Article

JO - Sleep

JF - Sleep

SN - 0161-8105

M1 - 00533-15

ER -