THE DESIGN IMPLICATIONS OF SOCIAL-INTERACTION IN A WORKPLACE SETTING

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THE DESIGN IMPLICATIONS OF SOCIAL-INTERACTION IN A WORKPLACE SETTING. / Backhouse, A; Drew, P.

In: Environment and planning b-Planning & design, Vol. 19, No. 5, 09.1992, p. 573-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Backhouse, A & Drew, P 1992, 'THE DESIGN IMPLICATIONS OF SOCIAL-INTERACTION IN A WORKPLACE SETTING', Environment and planning b-Planning & design, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 573-584.

APA

Backhouse, A., & Drew, P. (1992). THE DESIGN IMPLICATIONS OF SOCIAL-INTERACTION IN A WORKPLACE SETTING. Environment and planning b-Planning & design, 19(5), 573-584.

Vancouver

Backhouse A, Drew P. THE DESIGN IMPLICATIONS OF SOCIAL-INTERACTION IN A WORKPLACE SETTING. Environment and planning b-Planning & design. 1992 Sep;19(5):573-584.

Author

Backhouse, A ; Drew, P. / THE DESIGN IMPLICATIONS OF SOCIAL-INTERACTION IN A WORKPLACE SETTING. In: Environment and planning b-Planning & design. 1992 ; Vol. 19, No. 5. pp. 573-584.

Bibtex - Download

@article{ff392ffd747647d5ad0ceeba48b03f26,
title = "THE DESIGN IMPLICATIONS OF SOCIAL-INTERACTION IN A WORKPLACE SETTING",
abstract = "Space has been traditionally conceptualised as a passive host to its user activities. Increasingly, however, it is recognised that patterns of human interaction are derivative of the spatial configuration of which they are an integral part. This work is almost wholly confined to computational statistics of undifferentiated interactional encounters. In this paper specifically qualitative techniques will be used to extend and refine this model in order to demonstrate empirically that user behaviour may be more usefully conceptualised as a complex coalition of human behaviour and environmental resources. It is concluded that the relationship between partners of social interaction and spatial layout is more diverse and complex than previously understood, and that this complexity can only be fully accessed by a microanalytic qualitative methodology.",
author = "A Backhouse and P Drew",
year = "1992",
month = "9",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "573--584",
journal = "Environment and planning b-Planning & design",
issn = "0265-8135",
publisher = "Pion Ltd.",
number = "5",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - THE DESIGN IMPLICATIONS OF SOCIAL-INTERACTION IN A WORKPLACE SETTING

AU - Backhouse, A

AU - Drew, P

PY - 1992/9

Y1 - 1992/9

N2 - Space has been traditionally conceptualised as a passive host to its user activities. Increasingly, however, it is recognised that patterns of human interaction are derivative of the spatial configuration of which they are an integral part. This work is almost wholly confined to computational statistics of undifferentiated interactional encounters. In this paper specifically qualitative techniques will be used to extend and refine this model in order to demonstrate empirically that user behaviour may be more usefully conceptualised as a complex coalition of human behaviour and environmental resources. It is concluded that the relationship between partners of social interaction and spatial layout is more diverse and complex than previously understood, and that this complexity can only be fully accessed by a microanalytic qualitative methodology.

AB - Space has been traditionally conceptualised as a passive host to its user activities. Increasingly, however, it is recognised that patterns of human interaction are derivative of the spatial configuration of which they are an integral part. This work is almost wholly confined to computational statistics of undifferentiated interactional encounters. In this paper specifically qualitative techniques will be used to extend and refine this model in order to demonstrate empirically that user behaviour may be more usefully conceptualised as a complex coalition of human behaviour and environmental resources. It is concluded that the relationship between partners of social interaction and spatial layout is more diverse and complex than previously understood, and that this complexity can only be fully accessed by a microanalytic qualitative methodology.

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 573

EP - 584

JO - Environment and planning b-Planning & design

T2 - Environment and planning b-Planning & design

JF - Environment and planning b-Planning & design

SN - 0265-8135

IS - 5

ER -