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From the same journal

The Illuminators of the Hooked-g Scribe(s) and Production of Middle English Literature, c.1460-c. 1490

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The Illuminators of the Hooked-g Scribe(s) and Production of Middle English Literature, c.1460-c. 1490. / James-Maddocks, Holly Naomi.

In: The Chaucer Review, Vol. 51, No. 2, 07.04.2016, p. 151-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

James-Maddocks, HN 2016, 'The Illuminators of the Hooked-g Scribe(s) and Production of Middle English Literature, c.1460-c. 1490', The Chaucer Review, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 151-186. https://doi.org/10.5325/chaucerrev.51.2.0151

APA

James-Maddocks, H. N. (2016). The Illuminators of the Hooked-g Scribe(s) and Production of Middle English Literature, c.1460-c. 1490. The Chaucer Review, 51(2), 151-186. https://doi.org/10.5325/chaucerrev.51.2.0151

Vancouver

James-Maddocks HN. The Illuminators of the Hooked-g Scribe(s) and Production of Middle English Literature, c.1460-c. 1490. The Chaucer Review. 2016 Apr 7;51(2):151-186. https://doi.org/10.5325/chaucerrev.51.2.0151

Author

James-Maddocks, Holly Naomi. / The Illuminators of the Hooked-g Scribe(s) and Production of Middle English Literature, c.1460-c. 1490. In: The Chaucer Review. 2016 ; Vol. 51, No. 2. pp. 151-186.

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@article{740b67e02c834982b287f37b477e026a,
title = "The Illuminators of the Hooked-g Scribe(s) and Production of Middle English Literature, c.1460-c. 1490",
abstract = "This article integrates an art historical perspective into previous paleographical and linguistic approaches to manuscripts copied by the {"}hooked-g scribes.{"} By identifying the work of the illuminators in manuscripts outside of the hooked-g context, it is possible to reconstruct a tentative chronology for the fifteen undated manuscripts of the hooked-g scribes (a group inclusive of multiple copies of works by Chaucer, Lydgate, and Gower). Furthermore, a study of the illuminators reveals regular collaboration between one hooked-g scribe and two border artists, indicating that sustained cooperation between book craftsmen was considered a viable method of book production during the second half of the fifteenth century.",
author = "James-Maddocks, {Holly Naomi}",
year = "2016",
month = apr,
day = "7",
doi = "10.5325/chaucerrev.51.2.0151",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "151--186",
journal = "The Chaucer Review",
issn = "0009-2002",
publisher = "Penn State University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Illuminators of the Hooked-g Scribe(s) and Production of Middle English Literature, c.1460-c. 1490

AU - James-Maddocks, Holly Naomi

PY - 2016/4/7

Y1 - 2016/4/7

N2 - This article integrates an art historical perspective into previous paleographical and linguistic approaches to manuscripts copied by the "hooked-g scribes." By identifying the work of the illuminators in manuscripts outside of the hooked-g context, it is possible to reconstruct a tentative chronology for the fifteen undated manuscripts of the hooked-g scribes (a group inclusive of multiple copies of works by Chaucer, Lydgate, and Gower). Furthermore, a study of the illuminators reveals regular collaboration between one hooked-g scribe and two border artists, indicating that sustained cooperation between book craftsmen was considered a viable method of book production during the second half of the fifteenth century.

AB - This article integrates an art historical perspective into previous paleographical and linguistic approaches to manuscripts copied by the "hooked-g scribes." By identifying the work of the illuminators in manuscripts outside of the hooked-g context, it is possible to reconstruct a tentative chronology for the fifteen undated manuscripts of the hooked-g scribes (a group inclusive of multiple copies of works by Chaucer, Lydgate, and Gower). Furthermore, a study of the illuminators reveals regular collaboration between one hooked-g scribe and two border artists, indicating that sustained cooperation between book craftsmen was considered a viable method of book production during the second half of the fifteenth century.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84964786222&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5325/chaucerrev.51.2.0151

DO - 10.5325/chaucerrev.51.2.0151

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - 151

EP - 186

JO - The Chaucer Review

JF - The Chaucer Review

SN - 0009-2002

IS - 2

ER -