The multi-disciplinary search for underwater archaeology in the southern Red Sea

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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The multi-disciplinary search for underwater archaeology in the southern Red Sea. / Momber, Garry; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Rousakis, Grigoris; Bailey, Geoff.

Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea. ed. / Najeeb Rasul; Stewart Ian. Springer, 2019. p. 605-628.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Harvard

Momber, G, Sakellariou, D, Rousakis, G & Bailey, G 2019, The multi-disciplinary search for underwater archaeology in the southern Red Sea. in N Rasul & S Ian (eds), Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea. Springer, pp. 605-628, Saudi Geological Survey Red Sea Workshop, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, 14/02/16. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_27

APA

Momber, G., Sakellariou, D., Rousakis, G., & Bailey, G. (2019). The multi-disciplinary search for underwater archaeology in the southern Red Sea. In N. Rasul, & S. Ian (Eds.), Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea (pp. 605-628). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_27

Vancouver

Momber G, Sakellariou D, Rousakis G, Bailey G. The multi-disciplinary search for underwater archaeology in the southern Red Sea. In Rasul N, Ian S, editors, Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea. Springer. 2019. p. 605-628 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_27

Author

Momber, Garry ; Sakellariou, Dimitris ; Rousakis, Grigoris ; Bailey, Geoff. / The multi-disciplinary search for underwater archaeology in the southern Red Sea. Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea. editor / Najeeb Rasul ; Stewart Ian. Springer, 2019. pp. 605-628

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{b35d73b349f348f9821b1d721274090a,
title = "The multi-disciplinary search for underwater archaeology in the southern Red Sea",
abstract = "During the height of the last glacial maximum about 20,000 years ago, the sea-level was 120-130 m lower, making movement out of Africa into Arabia relatively easy. The Hanish Sill at the southern end of the Red Sea would only have been a few metres deep, less than 10 km wide and interspersed with small islands. Extensive evidence of archaeological artefacts dating to the Middle Palaeolithic has been found on the southern Arabian Peninsula demonstrating an earlier hominin presence. These movements might well have been facilitated by former periods of low sea level, as for the last million years or so, sea levels have averaged 40–60 m lower than today. These were times when larges areas of continental shelf around the Farasan Islands would have been exposed as a terrestrial landscape, providing a coastal environment that would have been attractive for animals and humans. This paper looks at a series of fieldwork projects that have helped characterise the submerged landscape and assess the potential for human occupation of the drowned lands around the Farasan Islands. Significant submerged wave-cut notches, platforms and lacustrine features were recorded, evidence for tectonic realignments was identified and areas with the potential for human occupation were investigated. The fieldwork has provided new information on the nature of the drowned landscape, characterised potential sites of human occupation and identified the challenges that need to be addressed by archaeologists as the investigations continue.",
keywords = "Maritime archaeology, Submerged cultural landscapes, Farasan Islands, Shell middens, Palaeolithic, Diving, Geophysical survey",
author = "Garry Momber and Dimitris Sakellariou and Grigoris Rousakis and Geoff Bailey",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_27",
language = "English",
isbn = "9783319994079",
pages = "605--628",
editor = "Najeeb Rasul and Stewart Ian",
booktitle = "Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - The multi-disciplinary search for underwater archaeology in the southern Red Sea

AU - Momber, Garry

AU - Sakellariou, Dimitris

AU - Rousakis, Grigoris

AU - Bailey, Geoff

PY - 2019/1/6

Y1 - 2019/1/6

N2 - During the height of the last glacial maximum about 20,000 years ago, the sea-level was 120-130 m lower, making movement out of Africa into Arabia relatively easy. The Hanish Sill at the southern end of the Red Sea would only have been a few metres deep, less than 10 km wide and interspersed with small islands. Extensive evidence of archaeological artefacts dating to the Middle Palaeolithic has been found on the southern Arabian Peninsula demonstrating an earlier hominin presence. These movements might well have been facilitated by former periods of low sea level, as for the last million years or so, sea levels have averaged 40–60 m lower than today. These were times when larges areas of continental shelf around the Farasan Islands would have been exposed as a terrestrial landscape, providing a coastal environment that would have been attractive for animals and humans. This paper looks at a series of fieldwork projects that have helped characterise the submerged landscape and assess the potential for human occupation of the drowned lands around the Farasan Islands. Significant submerged wave-cut notches, platforms and lacustrine features were recorded, evidence for tectonic realignments was identified and areas with the potential for human occupation were investigated. The fieldwork has provided new information on the nature of the drowned landscape, characterised potential sites of human occupation and identified the challenges that need to be addressed by archaeologists as the investigations continue.

AB - During the height of the last glacial maximum about 20,000 years ago, the sea-level was 120-130 m lower, making movement out of Africa into Arabia relatively easy. The Hanish Sill at the southern end of the Red Sea would only have been a few metres deep, less than 10 km wide and interspersed with small islands. Extensive evidence of archaeological artefacts dating to the Middle Palaeolithic has been found on the southern Arabian Peninsula demonstrating an earlier hominin presence. These movements might well have been facilitated by former periods of low sea level, as for the last million years or so, sea levels have averaged 40–60 m lower than today. These were times when larges areas of continental shelf around the Farasan Islands would have been exposed as a terrestrial landscape, providing a coastal environment that would have been attractive for animals and humans. This paper looks at a series of fieldwork projects that have helped characterise the submerged landscape and assess the potential for human occupation of the drowned lands around the Farasan Islands. Significant submerged wave-cut notches, platforms and lacustrine features were recorded, evidence for tectonic realignments was identified and areas with the potential for human occupation were investigated. The fieldwork has provided new information on the nature of the drowned landscape, characterised potential sites of human occupation and identified the challenges that need to be addressed by archaeologists as the investigations continue.

KW - Maritime archaeology

KW - Submerged cultural landscapes

KW - Farasan Islands

KW - Shell middens

KW - Palaeolithic

KW - Diving

KW - Geophysical survey

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_27

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_27

M3 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

SN - 9783319994079

SP - 605

EP - 628

BT - Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea

A2 - Rasul, Najeeb

A2 - Ian, Stewart

PB - Springer

ER -