By the same authors

From the same journal

THE NONWORD READING DEFICIT IN DEVELOPMENTAL DYSLEXIA - A REVIEW

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

Author(s)

Department/unit(s)

Publication details

JournalReading Research Quarterly
DatePublished - 1992
Issue number1
Volume27
Number of pages26
Pages (from-to)28-53
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

TO ELUCIDATE the characteristics of developmental dyslexics' reading skills, the authors evaluate the hypothesis that dyslexic children have a specific deficit in phonological reading processes. First, predictions from developmental models and longitudinal data on reading development are established. Methodological and theoretical issues are examined to try to reconcile inconsistent results reported in the literature. Inconsistency between studies can be accounted for by factors such as the age of the normal comparison group, complexity of materials used, and procedures used for forming matched groups. The adequacy of the intelligence match and the nature of the reading test used for matching could account for some differences between studies in a theoretically interesting way. The evidence supports the hypothesis of a specific deficit in use of phonological processes in reading. Finally, the experimental evidence is reexamined in light of changing theoretical perspectives. While recent conceptualizations of reading development provide a better framework in which to investigate individual differences, no evidence for distinct subtypes of dyslexia is found.

    Research areas

  • LEARNING-DISABLED CHILDREN, SHORT-TERM-MEMORY, WORD RECOGNITION, PHONOLOGICAL DYSLEXIA, NORMAL READERS, LEVEL DESIGN, POOR READERS, SKILLS, AWARENESS, PRONUNCIATION

Discover related content

Find related publications, people, projects, datasets and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations