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The Palaeolithic of the northern Red Sea — new investigations in Tabuk and Al-Jawf provinces, Saudi Arabia

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The Palaeolithic of the northern Red Sea — new investigations in Tabuk and Al-Jawf provinces, Saudi Arabia. / Inglis, Robyn Helen; Sinclair, Anthony; Alsharekh, Abdullah; Scott, Christopher; Al Othaibi, DhaifAllah.

In: Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies, Vol. 49, 11.07.2019, p. 167-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Inglis, RH, Sinclair, A, Alsharekh, A, Scott, C & Al Othaibi, D 2019, 'The Palaeolithic of the northern Red Sea — new investigations in Tabuk and Al-Jawf provinces, Saudi Arabia', Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies, vol. 49, pp. 167-186.

APA

Inglis, R. H., Sinclair, A., Alsharekh, A., Scott, C., & Al Othaibi, D. (2019). The Palaeolithic of the northern Red Sea — new investigations in Tabuk and Al-Jawf provinces, Saudi Arabia. Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies, 49, 167-186.

Vancouver

Inglis RH, Sinclair A, Alsharekh A, Scott C, Al Othaibi D. The Palaeolithic of the northern Red Sea — new investigations in Tabuk and Al-Jawf provinces, Saudi Arabia. Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies. 2019 Jul 11;49:167-186.

Author

Inglis, Robyn Helen ; Sinclair, Anthony ; Alsharekh, Abdullah ; Scott, Christopher ; Al Othaibi, DhaifAllah. / The Palaeolithic of the northern Red Sea — new investigations in Tabuk and Al-Jawf provinces, Saudi Arabia. In: Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies. 2019 ; Vol. 49. pp. 167-186.

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@article{638ce0a85b9e4a12befc2f275e5c94ba,
title = "The Palaeolithic of the northern Red Sea — new investigations in Tabuk and Al-Jawf provinces, Saudi Arabia",
abstract = "The land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula is one of the major routes proposed for hominin dispersal out of Africa for both Homo erectus and H. sapiens populations, and its neighbouring regions are, therefore, key to understanding these dispersals.Directly adjacent to the land bridge, the Saudi Arabian northern Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba coastlines have, until now, been subject to only rapid survey for Palaeolithic archaeology in the 1970s–80s, locating a handful of Palaeolithic artefacts.A twelve-day reconnaissance survey was undertaken by a Saudi-UK team along the northern Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba coast in February 2018 for Palaeolithic artefacts, the results of which are presented in this paper. Thirty-four locations were surveyed,across a range of landscape settings, the majority yielding Acheulean and prepared-core technology lithic artefacts, traditionally ascribed to Homo erectus and H. sapiens populations in Arabia respectively. These observations, while descriptive and necessarily brief, identify a previously undocumented record of Palaeolithic archaeology in a largely unexplored part of Saudi Arabia. The landscape settings in which artefacts were observed provide a geomorphological framework for locating Palaeolithic material in future surveys to realize the potential of the region to understand hominin dispersals from Africa into Arabia and beyond.",
author = "Inglis, {Robyn Helen} and Anthony Sinclair and Abdullah Alsharekh and Christopher Scott and {Al Othaibi}, DhaifAllah",
note = "{\textcopyright} Uploaded in accordance with the publisher{\textquoteright}s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details ",
year = "2019",
month = jul,
day = "11",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "167--186",
journal = "Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies",
issn = "0308-8421",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Palaeolithic of the northern Red Sea — new investigations in Tabuk and Al-Jawf provinces, Saudi Arabia

AU - Inglis, Robyn Helen

AU - Sinclair, Anthony

AU - Alsharekh, Abdullah

AU - Scott, Christopher

AU - Al Othaibi, DhaifAllah

N1 - © Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details

PY - 2019/7/11

Y1 - 2019/7/11

N2 - The land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula is one of the major routes proposed for hominin dispersal out of Africa for both Homo erectus and H. sapiens populations, and its neighbouring regions are, therefore, key to understanding these dispersals.Directly adjacent to the land bridge, the Saudi Arabian northern Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba coastlines have, until now, been subject to only rapid survey for Palaeolithic archaeology in the 1970s–80s, locating a handful of Palaeolithic artefacts.A twelve-day reconnaissance survey was undertaken by a Saudi-UK team along the northern Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba coast in February 2018 for Palaeolithic artefacts, the results of which are presented in this paper. Thirty-four locations were surveyed,across a range of landscape settings, the majority yielding Acheulean and prepared-core technology lithic artefacts, traditionally ascribed to Homo erectus and H. sapiens populations in Arabia respectively. These observations, while descriptive and necessarily brief, identify a previously undocumented record of Palaeolithic archaeology in a largely unexplored part of Saudi Arabia. The landscape settings in which artefacts were observed provide a geomorphological framework for locating Palaeolithic material in future surveys to realize the potential of the region to understand hominin dispersals from Africa into Arabia and beyond.

AB - The land bridge formed by the Sinai Peninsula is one of the major routes proposed for hominin dispersal out of Africa for both Homo erectus and H. sapiens populations, and its neighbouring regions are, therefore, key to understanding these dispersals.Directly adjacent to the land bridge, the Saudi Arabian northern Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba coastlines have, until now, been subject to only rapid survey for Palaeolithic archaeology in the 1970s–80s, locating a handful of Palaeolithic artefacts.A twelve-day reconnaissance survey was undertaken by a Saudi-UK team along the northern Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba coast in February 2018 for Palaeolithic artefacts, the results of which are presented in this paper. Thirty-four locations were surveyed,across a range of landscape settings, the majority yielding Acheulean and prepared-core technology lithic artefacts, traditionally ascribed to Homo erectus and H. sapiens populations in Arabia respectively. These observations, while descriptive and necessarily brief, identify a previously undocumented record of Palaeolithic archaeology in a largely unexplored part of Saudi Arabia. The landscape settings in which artefacts were observed provide a geomorphological framework for locating Palaeolithic material in future surveys to realize the potential of the region to understand hominin dispersals from Africa into Arabia and beyond.

M3 - Article

VL - 49

SP - 167

EP - 186

JO - Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies

JF - Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies

SN - 0308-8421

ER -