By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

The rise of an ideal: Tracing changing discourses of wellbeing

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

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The rise of an ideal : Tracing changing discourses of wellbeing. / Sointu, Eeva.

In: The Sociological Review, Vol. 53, No. 2, 05.2005, p. 255-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Harvard

Sointu, E 2005, 'The rise of an ideal: Tracing changing discourses of wellbeing', The Sociological Review, vol. 53, no. 2, pp. 255-274. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-954X.2005.00513.x

APA

Sointu, E. (2005). The rise of an ideal: Tracing changing discourses of wellbeing. The Sociological Review, 53(2), 255-274. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-954X.2005.00513.x

Vancouver

Sointu E. The rise of an ideal: Tracing changing discourses of wellbeing. The Sociological Review. 2005 May;53(2):255-274. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-954X.2005.00513.x

Author

Sointu, Eeva. / The rise of an ideal : Tracing changing discourses of wellbeing. In: The Sociological Review. 2005 ; Vol. 53, No. 2. pp. 255-274.

Bibtex - Download

@article{d8afc7ae54ab41e6a1c3bc1a54e778c8,
title = "The rise of an ideal: Tracing changing discourses of wellbeing",
abstract = "Wellbeing is a quality in demand in today's society. Wellbeing is virtue that is much desired, much promoted, and much debated. Yet, as an ideal, wellbeing is not a concept set in stone. Rather, conceptualisations and experiences of wellbeing are produced in and through wider social perceptions and practices. This article outlines and analyses contemporary conceptualisations of wellbeing and suggests that ideas of wellbeing capture and reproduce important social norms. Indeed, the increasing popularity of the ideal of wellbeing appears to reflect shifts in perceptions and experiences of individual agency and responsibility. In particular, dominant discourses of wellbeing relate to changes in subjectivity; they manifest a move from subjects as citizens to subjects as consumers. In a consumer society, wellbeing emerges as a normative obligation chosen and sought after by individual agents. This article is informed by social theories of subjectivity and critical analyses of selected newspaper reports from 1985 to 2003.",
author = "Eeva Sointu",
year = "2005",
month = may,
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-954X.2005.00513.x",
language = "English",
volume = "53",
pages = "255--274",
journal = "The Sociological Review",
issn = "0038-0261",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The rise of an ideal

T2 - Tracing changing discourses of wellbeing

AU - Sointu, Eeva

PY - 2005/5

Y1 - 2005/5

N2 - Wellbeing is a quality in demand in today's society. Wellbeing is virtue that is much desired, much promoted, and much debated. Yet, as an ideal, wellbeing is not a concept set in stone. Rather, conceptualisations and experiences of wellbeing are produced in and through wider social perceptions and practices. This article outlines and analyses contemporary conceptualisations of wellbeing and suggests that ideas of wellbeing capture and reproduce important social norms. Indeed, the increasing popularity of the ideal of wellbeing appears to reflect shifts in perceptions and experiences of individual agency and responsibility. In particular, dominant discourses of wellbeing relate to changes in subjectivity; they manifest a move from subjects as citizens to subjects as consumers. In a consumer society, wellbeing emerges as a normative obligation chosen and sought after by individual agents. This article is informed by social theories of subjectivity and critical analyses of selected newspaper reports from 1985 to 2003.

AB - Wellbeing is a quality in demand in today's society. Wellbeing is virtue that is much desired, much promoted, and much debated. Yet, as an ideal, wellbeing is not a concept set in stone. Rather, conceptualisations and experiences of wellbeing are produced in and through wider social perceptions and practices. This article outlines and analyses contemporary conceptualisations of wellbeing and suggests that ideas of wellbeing capture and reproduce important social norms. Indeed, the increasing popularity of the ideal of wellbeing appears to reflect shifts in perceptions and experiences of individual agency and responsibility. In particular, dominant discourses of wellbeing relate to changes in subjectivity; they manifest a move from subjects as citizens to subjects as consumers. In a consumer society, wellbeing emerges as a normative obligation chosen and sought after by individual agents. This article is informed by social theories of subjectivity and critical analyses of selected newspaper reports from 1985 to 2003.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=20444474659&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-954X.2005.00513.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-954X.2005.00513.x

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:20444474659

VL - 53

SP - 255

EP - 274

JO - The Sociological Review

JF - The Sociological Review

SN - 0038-0261

IS - 2

ER -