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From the same journal

The Roles of Structured Input Activities in Processing Instruction and the Kinds of Knowledge They Promote

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The Roles of Structured Input Activities in Processing Instruction and the Kinds of Knowledge They Promote. / Marsden, Emma Josephine; Chen, Hsin-Ying.

In: Language Learning, Vol. 61, No. 4, 12.2011, p. 1058–1098.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Marsden, EJ & Chen, H-Y 2011, 'The Roles of Structured Input Activities in Processing Instruction and the Kinds of Knowledge They Promote', Language Learning, vol. 61, no. 4, pp. 1058–1098. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9922.2011.00661.x

APA

Marsden, E. J., & Chen, H-Y. (2011). The Roles of Structured Input Activities in Processing Instruction and the Kinds of Knowledge They Promote. Language Learning, 61(4), 1058–1098. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9922.2011.00661.x

Vancouver

Marsden EJ, Chen H-Y. The Roles of Structured Input Activities in Processing Instruction and the Kinds of Knowledge They Promote. Language Learning. 2011 Dec;61(4):1058–1098. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9922.2011.00661.x

Author

Marsden, Emma Josephine ; Chen, Hsin-Ying. / The Roles of Structured Input Activities in Processing Instruction and the Kinds of Knowledge They Promote. In: Language Learning. 2011 ; Vol. 61, No. 4. pp. 1058–1098.

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@article{b14246e5cb294be7bdfea623773e081a,
title = "The Roles of Structured Input Activities in Processing Instruction and the Kinds of Knowledge They Promote",
abstract = "This study aimed to isolate the effects of the two input activities in Processing Instruction: Referential activities, which force learners to focus on a form and its meaning, and Affective activities, which contain exemplars of the target form and require learners to process sentence meaning. One hundred and twenty 12-year-old Taiwanese learners of L2 English were assigned to one of four groups: Referential + Affective, Referential only, Affective only, or Control. The treatments were computer based. Pre-, post- and delayed post-tests, including a timed grammaticality judgement, a written gapfill, an oral picture narration and a short semi-structured conversation, measured learning of the -ed past tense verb inflection. Findings suggested that Referential activities were responsible for the learning gains observed, that Affective activities did not provide additional benefits in terms of learning -ed, and that the gains observed displayed some broadly defined characteristics of explicit knowledge.",
keywords = "second language learning, English learning, grammar teaching, langauge teaching, Processing Instruction",
author = "Marsden, {Emma Josephine} and Hsin-Ying Chen",
year = "2011",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9922.2011.00661.x",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "1058–1098",
journal = "Language Learning",
issn = "0023-8333",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Roles of Structured Input Activities in Processing Instruction and the Kinds of Knowledge They Promote

AU - Marsden, Emma Josephine

AU - Chen, Hsin-Ying

PY - 2011/12

Y1 - 2011/12

N2 - This study aimed to isolate the effects of the two input activities in Processing Instruction: Referential activities, which force learners to focus on a form and its meaning, and Affective activities, which contain exemplars of the target form and require learners to process sentence meaning. One hundred and twenty 12-year-old Taiwanese learners of L2 English were assigned to one of four groups: Referential + Affective, Referential only, Affective only, or Control. The treatments were computer based. Pre-, post- and delayed post-tests, including a timed grammaticality judgement, a written gapfill, an oral picture narration and a short semi-structured conversation, measured learning of the -ed past tense verb inflection. Findings suggested that Referential activities were responsible for the learning gains observed, that Affective activities did not provide additional benefits in terms of learning -ed, and that the gains observed displayed some broadly defined characteristics of explicit knowledge.

AB - This study aimed to isolate the effects of the two input activities in Processing Instruction: Referential activities, which force learners to focus on a form and its meaning, and Affective activities, which contain exemplars of the target form and require learners to process sentence meaning. One hundred and twenty 12-year-old Taiwanese learners of L2 English were assigned to one of four groups: Referential + Affective, Referential only, Affective only, or Control. The treatments were computer based. Pre-, post- and delayed post-tests, including a timed grammaticality judgement, a written gapfill, an oral picture narration and a short semi-structured conversation, measured learning of the -ed past tense verb inflection. Findings suggested that Referential activities were responsible for the learning gains observed, that Affective activities did not provide additional benefits in terms of learning -ed, and that the gains observed displayed some broadly defined characteristics of explicit knowledge.

KW - second language learning

KW - English learning

KW - grammar teaching

KW - langauge teaching

KW - Processing Instruction

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9922.2011.00661.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9922.2011.00661.x

M3 - Article

VL - 61

SP - 1058

EP - 1098

JO - Language Learning

JF - Language Learning

SN - 0023-8333

IS - 4

ER -