By the same authors

Transparent hardware synthesis of Java for predictable large-scale distributed systems

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Standard

Transparent hardware synthesis of Java for predictable large-scale distributed systems. / Gray, Ian; Chan, Yu; Garside, Jamie; Audsley, Neil; Wellings, Andy; Wellings, Andrew John.

2015. 1-2.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Harvard

Gray, I, Chan, Y, Garside, J, Audsley, N, Wellings, A & Wellings, AJ 2015, 'Transparent hardware synthesis of Java for predictable large-scale distributed systems' pp. 1-2. https://doi.org/http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1508/1508.07142.pdf

APA

Gray, I., Chan, Y., Garside, J., Audsley, N., Wellings, A., & Wellings, A. J. (2015). Transparent hardware synthesis of Java for predictable large-scale distributed systems. 1-2. https://doi.org/http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1508/1508.07142.pdf

Vancouver

Gray I, Chan Y, Garside J, Audsley N, Wellings A, Wellings AJ. Transparent hardware synthesis of Java for predictable large-scale distributed systems. 2015. https://doi.org/http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1508/1508.07142.pdf

Author

Gray, Ian ; Chan, Yu ; Garside, Jamie ; Audsley, Neil ; Wellings, Andy ; Wellings, Andrew John. / Transparent hardware synthesis of Java for predictable large-scale distributed systems. 2 p.

Bibtex - Download

@conference{6ea42900e5d34e2faa4195f37ee50a0d,
title = "Transparent hardware synthesis of Java for predictable large-scale distributed systems",
abstract = "The JUNIPER project is developing a framework for the construction of large-scale distributed systems in which execution time bounds can be guaranteed. Part of this work involves the automatic implementation of input Java code on FPGAs, both for speed and predictability. An important focus of this work is to make the use of FPGAs transparent though runtime co-design and partial reconfiguration. Initial results show that the use of Java does not hamper hardware generation, and provides tight execution time estimates. This paper describes an overview the approach taken, and presents some preliminary results that demonstrate the promise in the technique.",
keywords = "cs.DC",
author = "Ian Gray and Yu Chan and Jamie Garside and Neil Audsley and Andy Wellings and Wellings, {Andrew John}",
note = "Presented at Second International Workshop on FPGAs for Software Programmers (FSP 2015) (arXiv:1508.06320)",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1508/1508.07142.pdf",
language = "English",
pages = "1--2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CONF

T1 - Transparent hardware synthesis of Java for predictable large-scale distributed systems

AU - Gray, Ian

AU - Chan, Yu

AU - Garside, Jamie

AU - Audsley, Neil

AU - Wellings, Andy

AU - Wellings, Andrew John

N1 - Presented at Second International Workshop on FPGAs for Software Programmers (FSP 2015) (arXiv:1508.06320)

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - The JUNIPER project is developing a framework for the construction of large-scale distributed systems in which execution time bounds can be guaranteed. Part of this work involves the automatic implementation of input Java code on FPGAs, both for speed and predictability. An important focus of this work is to make the use of FPGAs transparent though runtime co-design and partial reconfiguration. Initial results show that the use of Java does not hamper hardware generation, and provides tight execution time estimates. This paper describes an overview the approach taken, and presents some preliminary results that demonstrate the promise in the technique.

AB - The JUNIPER project is developing a framework for the construction of large-scale distributed systems in which execution time bounds can be guaranteed. Part of this work involves the automatic implementation of input Java code on FPGAs, both for speed and predictability. An important focus of this work is to make the use of FPGAs transparent though runtime co-design and partial reconfiguration. Initial results show that the use of Java does not hamper hardware generation, and provides tight execution time estimates. This paper describes an overview the approach taken, and presents some preliminary results that demonstrate the promise in the technique.

KW - cs.DC

U2 - http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1508/1508.07142.pdf

DO - http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1508/1508.07142.pdf

M3 - Paper

SP - 1

EP - 2

ER -