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From the same journal

Understanding the narratives of people who live with medically unexplained illness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Understanding the narratives of people who live with medically unexplained illness. / Nettleton, S ; Watt, I ; O'Malley, L ; Duffey, P .

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 56, No. 2, 02.2005, p. 205-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Nettleton, S, Watt, I, O'Malley, L & Duffey, P 2005, 'Understanding the narratives of people who live with medically unexplained illness', Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 205-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2004.02.010

APA

Nettleton, S., Watt, I., O'Malley, L., & Duffey, P. (2005). Understanding the narratives of people who live with medically unexplained illness. Patient Education and Counseling, 56(2), 205-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2004.02.010

Vancouver

Nettleton S, Watt I, O'Malley L, Duffey P. Understanding the narratives of people who live with medically unexplained illness. Patient Education and Counseling. 2005 Feb;56(2):205-210. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2004.02.010

Author

Nettleton, S ; Watt, I ; O'Malley, L ; Duffey, P . / Understanding the narratives of people who live with medically unexplained illness. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2005 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 205-210.

Bibtex - Download

@article{75bf80a14d8541289535ebfd8b123c3e,
title = "Understanding the narratives of people who live with medically unexplained illness",
abstract = "This paper reports on a qualitative study, which explores the narratives of patients, who live with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) and who have not secured a diagnostic label. Interviews were undertaken with 18 participants (5 men and 13 women) who attended a neurology outpatients department in the UK. Three features of the patients’ narratives identified are: the ‘chaotic’ structure of their illness narratives; concern that symptoms may be ‘all in the mind’; and their status as ‘medical orphans’. All the patients acknowledge that diagnosis is difficult and accept that a medical explanation will invariably be possible. However, they are more concerned to secure some form of ongoing medical and social support. An understanding of both the structure as well as the content of patients’ narratives of undiagnosed illness may contribute to the development of more effective and sensitive patient centred care.",
keywords = "medically unexplained symptoms, undiagnosed illness, illness narratives, neurology, PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS, BACK-PAIN, MEDICINE",
author = "S Nettleton and I Watt and L O'Malley and P Duffey",
year = "2005",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2004.02.010",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "205--210",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Understanding the narratives of people who live with medically unexplained illness

AU - Nettleton, S

AU - Watt, I

AU - O'Malley, L

AU - Duffey, P

PY - 2005/2

Y1 - 2005/2

N2 - This paper reports on a qualitative study, which explores the narratives of patients, who live with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) and who have not secured a diagnostic label. Interviews were undertaken with 18 participants (5 men and 13 women) who attended a neurology outpatients department in the UK. Three features of the patients’ narratives identified are: the ‘chaotic’ structure of their illness narratives; concern that symptoms may be ‘all in the mind’; and their status as ‘medical orphans’. All the patients acknowledge that diagnosis is difficult and accept that a medical explanation will invariably be possible. However, they are more concerned to secure some form of ongoing medical and social support. An understanding of both the structure as well as the content of patients’ narratives of undiagnosed illness may contribute to the development of more effective and sensitive patient centred care.

AB - This paper reports on a qualitative study, which explores the narratives of patients, who live with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) and who have not secured a diagnostic label. Interviews were undertaken with 18 participants (5 men and 13 women) who attended a neurology outpatients department in the UK. Three features of the patients’ narratives identified are: the ‘chaotic’ structure of their illness narratives; concern that symptoms may be ‘all in the mind’; and their status as ‘medical orphans’. All the patients acknowledge that diagnosis is difficult and accept that a medical explanation will invariably be possible. However, they are more concerned to secure some form of ongoing medical and social support. An understanding of both the structure as well as the content of patients’ narratives of undiagnosed illness may contribute to the development of more effective and sensitive patient centred care.

KW - medically unexplained symptoms

KW - undiagnosed illness

KW - illness narratives

KW - neurology

KW - PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS

KW - BACK-PAIN

KW - MEDICINE

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2004.02.010

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2004.02.010

M3 - Article

VL - 56

SP - 205

EP - 210

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

IS - 2

ER -