By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Urbanism as Material Discourse: Questions of Interpretation in Contemporary Urban Theory.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Urbanism as Material Discourse : Questions of Interpretation in Contemporary Urban Theory. / Parker, Simon Frank.

In: URBAN GEOGRAPHY, Vol. 33, No. 4, 16.05.2012, p. 530-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Parker, SF 2012, 'Urbanism as Material Discourse: Questions of Interpretation in Contemporary Urban Theory.', URBAN GEOGRAPHY, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 530-544. https://doi.org/10.2747/0272-3638.33.4.530

APA

Parker, S. F. (2012). Urbanism as Material Discourse: Questions of Interpretation in Contemporary Urban Theory. URBAN GEOGRAPHY, 33(4), 530-544. https://doi.org/10.2747/0272-3638.33.4.530

Vancouver

Parker SF. Urbanism as Material Discourse: Questions of Interpretation in Contemporary Urban Theory. URBAN GEOGRAPHY. 2012 May 16;33(4):530-544. https://doi.org/10.2747/0272-3638.33.4.530

Author

Parker, Simon Frank. / Urbanism as Material Discourse : Questions of Interpretation in Contemporary Urban Theory. In: URBAN GEOGRAPHY. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 530-544.

Bibtex - Download

@article{bf44990239fc4cd18f8a5e5c674d37d4,
title = "Urbanism as Material Discourse: Questions of Interpretation in Contemporary Urban Theory.",
abstract = "This essay seeks to challenge the idea that those who consider themselves to be empirical urban researchers are necessarily concerned with a quite separate quest for knowledge than those involved in the interpretation of representations and narratives of the urban experience. Two essential claims are advanced. First, the attempt to make an epistemological distinction between the city as a lived, physical space and the city as a complex ensemble of shared knowledge, memory, and representation, undermines rather than clarifies the purpose of critical urban research. And second, that urban culture—broadly defined—is understood and constructed narratively through the shared medium of its material discourses. In other words, spatiotemporal narratives allow the urban complex to operate both as a self-legitimating sociospatial system as well as promoting the economic, social, political, and cultural discourses that form the material bases of the unequal distribution of social power. ",
keywords = "urban theory, hermeneutics, representation, Ricoeur, Foucault",
author = "Parker, {Simon Frank}",
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language = "English",
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journal = "URBAN GEOGRAPHY",
issn = "0272-3638",
publisher = "Bellwether Publishing, Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Urbanism as Material Discourse

T2 - Questions of Interpretation in Contemporary Urban Theory.

AU - Parker, Simon Frank

PY - 2012/5/16

Y1 - 2012/5/16

N2 - This essay seeks to challenge the idea that those who consider themselves to be empirical urban researchers are necessarily concerned with a quite separate quest for knowledge than those involved in the interpretation of representations and narratives of the urban experience. Two essential claims are advanced. First, the attempt to make an epistemological distinction between the city as a lived, physical space and the city as a complex ensemble of shared knowledge, memory, and representation, undermines rather than clarifies the purpose of critical urban research. And second, that urban culture—broadly defined—is understood and constructed narratively through the shared medium of its material discourses. In other words, spatiotemporal narratives allow the urban complex to operate both as a self-legitimating sociospatial system as well as promoting the economic, social, political, and cultural discourses that form the material bases of the unequal distribution of social power.

AB - This essay seeks to challenge the idea that those who consider themselves to be empirical urban researchers are necessarily concerned with a quite separate quest for knowledge than those involved in the interpretation of representations and narratives of the urban experience. Two essential claims are advanced. First, the attempt to make an epistemological distinction between the city as a lived, physical space and the city as a complex ensemble of shared knowledge, memory, and representation, undermines rather than clarifies the purpose of critical urban research. And second, that urban culture—broadly defined—is understood and constructed narratively through the shared medium of its material discourses. In other words, spatiotemporal narratives allow the urban complex to operate both as a self-legitimating sociospatial system as well as promoting the economic, social, political, and cultural discourses that form the material bases of the unequal distribution of social power.

KW - urban theory

KW - hermeneutics

KW - representation

KW - Ricoeur

KW - Foucault

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U2 - 10.2747/0272-3638.33.4.530

DO - 10.2747/0272-3638.33.4.530

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 530

EP - 544

JO - URBAN GEOGRAPHY

JF - URBAN GEOGRAPHY

SN - 0272-3638

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ER -