By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Using behavioural theories to optimise shared haemodialysis care: A qualitative intervention development study of patient and professional experience

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Using behavioural theories to optimise shared haemodialysis care : A qualitative intervention development study of patient and professional experience. / Glidewell, Liz; Boocock, Stephen; Pine, Kelvin; Campbell, Rebecca; Hackett, Julia; Gill, Shamila; Wilkie, Martin.

In: Implementation science, Vol. 8, No. 1, 118, 07.10.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Glidewell, L, Boocock, S, Pine, K, Campbell, R, Hackett, J, Gill, S & Wilkie, M 2013, 'Using behavioural theories to optimise shared haemodialysis care: A qualitative intervention development study of patient and professional experience', Implementation science, vol. 8, no. 1, 118. https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-8-118

APA

Glidewell, L., Boocock, S., Pine, K., Campbell, R., Hackett, J., Gill, S., & Wilkie, M. (2013). Using behavioural theories to optimise shared haemodialysis care: A qualitative intervention development study of patient and professional experience. Implementation science, 8(1), [118]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-8-118

Vancouver

Glidewell L, Boocock S, Pine K, Campbell R, Hackett J, Gill S et al. Using behavioural theories to optimise shared haemodialysis care: A qualitative intervention development study of patient and professional experience. Implementation science. 2013 Oct 7;8(1). 118. https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-5908-8-118

Author

Glidewell, Liz ; Boocock, Stephen ; Pine, Kelvin ; Campbell, Rebecca ; Hackett, Julia ; Gill, Shamila ; Wilkie, Martin. / Using behavioural theories to optimise shared haemodialysis care : A qualitative intervention development study of patient and professional experience. In: Implementation science. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.

Bibtex - Download

@article{d4d1314ffa034e3ea6c498e09a2020d7,
title = "Using behavioural theories to optimise shared haemodialysis care: A qualitative intervention development study of patient and professional experience",
abstract = "Background: Patients in control of their own haemodialysis report better outcomes than those receiving professional controlled care in a hospital setting, even though home and hospital haemodialysis are largely equivalent from mechanical and physiological perspectives. Shared Haemodialysis Care (SHC) describes an initiative in which hospital haemodialysis patients are supported by dialysis staff to become as involved as they wish in their own care; and can improve patient safety, satisfaction and may reduce costs. We do not understand why interventions to support self-management in other conditions have variable effects or how to optimise the delivery of SHC. The purpose of this study was to identify perceived patient and professional (nurses and healthcare assistants) barriers to the uptake of SHC, and to use these data to identify intervention components to optimise care.Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews with patients and professionals were conducted to identify barriers and facilitators. Data were coded to behavioural theory to identify solutions. A national UK learning event with multiple stakeholders (patients, carers, commissioners and professionals) explored the salience of these barriers and the acceptability of solutions.Results: A complex intervention strategy was designed to optimise SHC for patients and professionals. Interviews were conducted with patients (n = 15) and professionals (n = 7) in two hospitals and three satellite units piloting SHC. Data from patient and professional interviews could be coded to behavioural theory. Analyses identified key barriers (knowledge, beliefs about capabilities, skills and environmental context and resources). An intervention strategy that focuses on providing, first, patients with information about the shared nature of care, how to read prescriptions and use machines, and second, providing professionals with skills and protected time to teach both professionals/patients, as well as providing continual review, may improve the implementation of SHC and be acceptable to stakeholders.Conclusions: We have developed an intervention strategy to improve the implementation of SHC for patients and professionals. While this intervention strategy has been systematically developed using behavioural theory, it should be rigorously tested in a subsequent effectiveness evaluation study prior to implementation to ensure that shared haemodialysis care can be delivered equitably, efficiently and safely for all patients.",
keywords = "Barriers and facilitators, Behavioural theory, Haemodialysis, Shared care",
author = "Liz Glidewell and Stephen Boocock and Kelvin Pine and Rebecca Campbell and Julia Hackett and Shamila Gill and Martin Wilkie",
year = "2013",
month = oct,
day = "7",
doi = "10.1186/1748-5908-8-118",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Implementation science",
issn = "1748-5908",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using behavioural theories to optimise shared haemodialysis care

T2 - A qualitative intervention development study of patient and professional experience

AU - Glidewell, Liz

AU - Boocock, Stephen

AU - Pine, Kelvin

AU - Campbell, Rebecca

AU - Hackett, Julia

AU - Gill, Shamila

AU - Wilkie, Martin

PY - 2013/10/7

Y1 - 2013/10/7

N2 - Background: Patients in control of their own haemodialysis report better outcomes than those receiving professional controlled care in a hospital setting, even though home and hospital haemodialysis are largely equivalent from mechanical and physiological perspectives. Shared Haemodialysis Care (SHC) describes an initiative in which hospital haemodialysis patients are supported by dialysis staff to become as involved as they wish in their own care; and can improve patient safety, satisfaction and may reduce costs. We do not understand why interventions to support self-management in other conditions have variable effects or how to optimise the delivery of SHC. The purpose of this study was to identify perceived patient and professional (nurses and healthcare assistants) barriers to the uptake of SHC, and to use these data to identify intervention components to optimise care.Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews with patients and professionals were conducted to identify barriers and facilitators. Data were coded to behavioural theory to identify solutions. A national UK learning event with multiple stakeholders (patients, carers, commissioners and professionals) explored the salience of these barriers and the acceptability of solutions.Results: A complex intervention strategy was designed to optimise SHC for patients and professionals. Interviews were conducted with patients (n = 15) and professionals (n = 7) in two hospitals and three satellite units piloting SHC. Data from patient and professional interviews could be coded to behavioural theory. Analyses identified key barriers (knowledge, beliefs about capabilities, skills and environmental context and resources). An intervention strategy that focuses on providing, first, patients with information about the shared nature of care, how to read prescriptions and use machines, and second, providing professionals with skills and protected time to teach both professionals/patients, as well as providing continual review, may improve the implementation of SHC and be acceptable to stakeholders.Conclusions: We have developed an intervention strategy to improve the implementation of SHC for patients and professionals. While this intervention strategy has been systematically developed using behavioural theory, it should be rigorously tested in a subsequent effectiveness evaluation study prior to implementation to ensure that shared haemodialysis care can be delivered equitably, efficiently and safely for all patients.

AB - Background: Patients in control of their own haemodialysis report better outcomes than those receiving professional controlled care in a hospital setting, even though home and hospital haemodialysis are largely equivalent from mechanical and physiological perspectives. Shared Haemodialysis Care (SHC) describes an initiative in which hospital haemodialysis patients are supported by dialysis staff to become as involved as they wish in their own care; and can improve patient safety, satisfaction and may reduce costs. We do not understand why interventions to support self-management in other conditions have variable effects or how to optimise the delivery of SHC. The purpose of this study was to identify perceived patient and professional (nurses and healthcare assistants) barriers to the uptake of SHC, and to use these data to identify intervention components to optimise care.Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews with patients and professionals were conducted to identify barriers and facilitators. Data were coded to behavioural theory to identify solutions. A national UK learning event with multiple stakeholders (patients, carers, commissioners and professionals) explored the salience of these barriers and the acceptability of solutions.Results: A complex intervention strategy was designed to optimise SHC for patients and professionals. Interviews were conducted with patients (n = 15) and professionals (n = 7) in two hospitals and three satellite units piloting SHC. Data from patient and professional interviews could be coded to behavioural theory. Analyses identified key barriers (knowledge, beliefs about capabilities, skills and environmental context and resources). An intervention strategy that focuses on providing, first, patients with information about the shared nature of care, how to read prescriptions and use machines, and second, providing professionals with skills and protected time to teach both professionals/patients, as well as providing continual review, may improve the implementation of SHC and be acceptable to stakeholders.Conclusions: We have developed an intervention strategy to improve the implementation of SHC for patients and professionals. While this intervention strategy has been systematically developed using behavioural theory, it should be rigorously tested in a subsequent effectiveness evaluation study prior to implementation to ensure that shared haemodialysis care can be delivered equitably, efficiently and safely for all patients.

KW - Barriers and facilitators

KW - Behavioural theory

KW - Haemodialysis

KW - Shared care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84885007724&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1748-5908-8-118

DO - 10.1186/1748-5908-8-118

M3 - Article

C2 - 24098920

AN - SCOPUS:84885007724

VL - 8

JO - Implementation science

JF - Implementation science

SN - 1748-5908

IS - 1

M1 - 118

ER -