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From the same journal

Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder stratospheric ozone measurements

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Published copy (DOI)

Author(s)

  • L. Froidevaux
  • Y. B. Jiang
  • A. Lambert
  • N. J. Livesey
  • W. G. Read
  • J. W. Waters
  • E. V. Browell
  • J. W. Hair
  • M. A. Avery
  • T. J. Mcgee
  • L. W. Twigg
  • G. K. Sumnicht
  • K. W. Jucks
  • J. J. Margitan
  • B. Sen
  • R. A. Stachnik
  • G. C. Toon
  • C. D. Boone
  • K. A. Walker
  • M. J. Filipiak
  • R. S. Harwood
  • R. A. Fuller
  • G. L. Manney
  • M. J. Schwartz
  • W. H. Daffer
  • B. J. Drouin
  • R. E. Cofield
  • D. T. Cuddy
  • R. F. Jarnot
  • B. W. Knosp
  • V. S. Perun
  • W. V. Snyder
  • P. C. Stek
  • R. P. Thurstans
  • P. A. Wagner

Department/unit(s)

Publication details

JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
DatePublished - 9 May 2008
Issue numberD15
Volume113
Number of pages24
Pages (from-to)-
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite has provided essentially daily global measurements of ozone (O-3) profiles from the upper troposphere to the upper mesosphere since August of 2004. This paper focuses on validation of the MLS stratospheric standard ozone product and its uncertainties, as obtained from the 240 GHz radiometer measurements, with a few results concerning mesospheric ozone. We compare average differences and scatter from matched MLS version 2.2 profiles and coincident ozone profiles from other satellite instruments, as well as from aircraft lidar measurements taken during Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaigns. Ozone comparisons are also made between MLS and balloon-borne remote and in situ sensors. We provide a detailed characterization of random and systematic uncertainties for MLS ozone. We typically find better agreement in the comparisons using MLS version 2.2 ozone than the version 1.5 data. The agreement and the MLS uncertainty estimates in the stratosphere are often of the order of 5%, with values closer to 10% (and occasionally 20%) at the lowest stratospheric altitudes, where small positive MLS biases can be found. There is very good agreement in the latitudinal distributions obtained from MLS and from coincident profiles from other satellite instruments, as well as from aircraft lidar data along the MLS track.

    Research areas

  • HALOGEN OCCULTATION EXPERIMENT, EOS MLS, REMOTE MEASUREMENTS, SATELLITE, PROFILES, SYSTEM, SPECTROMETER, RETRIEVAL, QUALITY, MODEL

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