By the same authors

Victims of Fashion: Animal Commodities in Victorian Britain

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Standard

Victims of Fashion : Animal Commodities in Victorian Britain. / Cowie, Helen Louise.

Cambridge : Cambridge University Pres, 2021. 300 p. (Science in History).

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Harvard

Cowie, HL 2021, Victims of Fashion: Animal Commodities in Victorian Britain. Science in History, Cambridge University Pres, Cambridge.

APA

Cowie, H. L. (2021). Victims of Fashion: Animal Commodities in Victorian Britain. (Science in History). Cambridge University Pres.

Vancouver

Cowie HL. Victims of Fashion: Animal Commodities in Victorian Britain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Pres, 2021. 300 p. (Science in History).

Author

Cowie, Helen Louise. / Victims of Fashion : Animal Commodities in Victorian Britain. Cambridge : Cambridge University Pres, 2021. 300 p. (Science in History).

Bibtex - Download

@book{e7f10c0a81bf46b49350e0fd26ceccd1,
title = "Victims of Fashion: Animal Commodities in Victorian Britain",
abstract = "Animal products were used extensively in nineteenth-century Britain. A middle-class Victorian woman might wear a dress made of alpaca wool, drape herself in a sealskin jacket, brush her hair with a tortoiseshell comb, and sport feathers in her hat. She might entertain her friends by playing a piano with ivory keys or own a parrot or monkey as a living fashion accessory. In this innovative study, Helen Cowie examines the role of these animal-based commodities in Britain in the long nineteenth century and traces their rise and fall in popularity in response to changing tastes, availability, and ethical concerns. Focusing on six popular animal products – feathers, sealskin, ivory, alpaca wool, perfumes, and exotic pets – she considers how animal commodities were sourced and processed, how they were marketed and how they were consumed. She also assesses the ecological impact of nineteenth-century fashion.",
keywords = "animals, commodities, fashion, Victorian, nineteenth century, Britain, fur seals, egrets, ostriches, elephants, alpacas, vicunas, musk deer, civets, monkeys, parrots, tortoises, exotic pets, perfumes, wool, ivory, fur, feathers, animal rights, environmental history",
author = "Cowie, {Helen Louise}",
year = "2021",
month = nov,
day = "18",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781108495172",
series = "Science in History",
publisher = "Cambridge University Pres",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - BOOK

T1 - Victims of Fashion

T2 - Animal Commodities in Victorian Britain

AU - Cowie, Helen Louise

PY - 2021/11/18

Y1 - 2021/11/18

N2 - Animal products were used extensively in nineteenth-century Britain. A middle-class Victorian woman might wear a dress made of alpaca wool, drape herself in a sealskin jacket, brush her hair with a tortoiseshell comb, and sport feathers in her hat. She might entertain her friends by playing a piano with ivory keys or own a parrot or monkey as a living fashion accessory. In this innovative study, Helen Cowie examines the role of these animal-based commodities in Britain in the long nineteenth century and traces their rise and fall in popularity in response to changing tastes, availability, and ethical concerns. Focusing on six popular animal products – feathers, sealskin, ivory, alpaca wool, perfumes, and exotic pets – she considers how animal commodities were sourced and processed, how they were marketed and how they were consumed. She also assesses the ecological impact of nineteenth-century fashion.

AB - Animal products were used extensively in nineteenth-century Britain. A middle-class Victorian woman might wear a dress made of alpaca wool, drape herself in a sealskin jacket, brush her hair with a tortoiseshell comb, and sport feathers in her hat. She might entertain her friends by playing a piano with ivory keys or own a parrot or monkey as a living fashion accessory. In this innovative study, Helen Cowie examines the role of these animal-based commodities in Britain in the long nineteenth century and traces their rise and fall in popularity in response to changing tastes, availability, and ethical concerns. Focusing on six popular animal products – feathers, sealskin, ivory, alpaca wool, perfumes, and exotic pets – she considers how animal commodities were sourced and processed, how they were marketed and how they were consumed. She also assesses the ecological impact of nineteenth-century fashion.

KW - animals, commodities, fashion, Victorian, nineteenth century, Britain, fur seals, egrets, ostriches, elephants, alpacas, vicunas, musk deer, civets, monkeys, parrots, tortoises, exotic pets, perfumes, wool, ivory, fur, feathers, animal rights, environment

UR - https://www.cambridge.org/gb/academic/subjects/history/history-science-and-technology/victims-fashion?format=HB

M3 - Book

SN - 9781108495172

T3 - Science in History

BT - Victims of Fashion

PB - Cambridge University Pres

CY - Cambridge

ER -