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When does speech sound disorder matter for literacy? The role of disordered speech errors, co-occurring language impairment, and family-risk of dyslexia

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When does speech sound disorder matter for literacy? The role of disordered speech errors, co-occurring language impairment, and family-risk of dyslexia. / Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna Emma; Carroll, Julia M.; Leavett, Ruth; Hulme, Charles ; Snowling, Margaret Jean.

In: Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, Vol. 58, No. 2, 02.2017, p. 197-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Hayiou-Thomas, ME, Carroll, JM, Leavett, R, Hulme, C & Snowling, MJ 2017, 'When does speech sound disorder matter for literacy? The role of disordered speech errors, co-occurring language impairment, and family-risk of dyslexia', Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 197-205. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12648

APA

Hayiou-Thomas, M. E., Carroll, J. M., Leavett, R., Hulme, C., & Snowling, M. J. (2017). When does speech sound disorder matter for literacy? The role of disordered speech errors, co-occurring language impairment, and family-risk of dyslexia. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 58(2), 197-205. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12648

Vancouver

Hayiou-Thomas ME, Carroll JM, Leavett R, Hulme C, Snowling MJ. When does speech sound disorder matter for literacy? The role of disordered speech errors, co-occurring language impairment, and family-risk of dyslexia. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry. 2017 Feb;58(2):197-205. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12648

Author

Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna Emma ; Carroll, Julia M. ; Leavett, Ruth ; Hulme, Charles ; Snowling, Margaret Jean. / When does speech sound disorder matter for literacy? The role of disordered speech errors, co-occurring language impairment, and family-risk of dyslexia. In: Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry. 2017 ; Vol. 58, No. 2. pp. 197-205.

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@article{1cd62458275642019f3cf14efc1f60d0,
title = "When does speech sound disorder matter for literacy?: The role of disordered speech errors, co-occurring language impairment, and family-risk of dyslexia",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: This study considers the role of early speech difficulties in literacy development, in the context of additional risk factors.METHOD: Children were identified with speech sound disorder (SSD) at the age of 3½ years, on the basis of performance on the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology. Their literacy skills were assessed at the start of formal reading instruction (age 5½), using measures of phoneme awareness, word-level reading and spelling; and 3 years later (age 8), using measures of word-level reading, spelling and reading comprehension.RESULTS: The presence of early SSD conferred a small but significant risk of poor phonemic skills and spelling at the age of 5½ and of poor word reading at the age of 8. Furthermore, within the group with SSD, the persistence of speech difficulties to the point of school entry was associated with poorer emergent literacy skills, and children with 'disordered' speech errors had poorer word reading skills than children whose speech errors indicated 'delay'. In contrast, the initial severity of SSD was not a significant predictor of reading development. Beyond the domain of speech, the presence of a co-occurring language impairment was strongly predictive of literacy skills and having a family risk of dyslexia predicted additional variance in literacy at both time-points.CONCLUSIONS: Early SSD alone has only modest effects on literacy development but when additional risk factors are present, these can have serious negative consequences, consistent with the view that multiple risks accumulate to predict reading disorders.",
author = "Hayiou-Thomas, {Marianna Emma} and Carroll, {Julia M.} and Ruth Leavett and Charles Hulme and Snowling, {Margaret Jean}",
note = "{\circledC} 2016 The Authors.",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/jcpp.12648",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "197--205",
journal = "Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry",
issn = "0021-9630",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - When does speech sound disorder matter for literacy?

T2 - The role of disordered speech errors, co-occurring language impairment, and family-risk of dyslexia

AU - Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna Emma

AU - Carroll, Julia M.

AU - Leavett, Ruth

AU - Hulme, Charles

AU - Snowling, Margaret Jean

N1 - © 2016 The Authors.

PY - 2017/2

Y1 - 2017/2

N2 - BACKGROUND: This study considers the role of early speech difficulties in literacy development, in the context of additional risk factors.METHOD: Children were identified with speech sound disorder (SSD) at the age of 3½ years, on the basis of performance on the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology. Their literacy skills were assessed at the start of formal reading instruction (age 5½), using measures of phoneme awareness, word-level reading and spelling; and 3 years later (age 8), using measures of word-level reading, spelling and reading comprehension.RESULTS: The presence of early SSD conferred a small but significant risk of poor phonemic skills and spelling at the age of 5½ and of poor word reading at the age of 8. Furthermore, within the group with SSD, the persistence of speech difficulties to the point of school entry was associated with poorer emergent literacy skills, and children with 'disordered' speech errors had poorer word reading skills than children whose speech errors indicated 'delay'. In contrast, the initial severity of SSD was not a significant predictor of reading development. Beyond the domain of speech, the presence of a co-occurring language impairment was strongly predictive of literacy skills and having a family risk of dyslexia predicted additional variance in literacy at both time-points.CONCLUSIONS: Early SSD alone has only modest effects on literacy development but when additional risk factors are present, these can have serious negative consequences, consistent with the view that multiple risks accumulate to predict reading disorders.

AB - BACKGROUND: This study considers the role of early speech difficulties in literacy development, in the context of additional risk factors.METHOD: Children were identified with speech sound disorder (SSD) at the age of 3½ years, on the basis of performance on the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology. Their literacy skills were assessed at the start of formal reading instruction (age 5½), using measures of phoneme awareness, word-level reading and spelling; and 3 years later (age 8), using measures of word-level reading, spelling and reading comprehension.RESULTS: The presence of early SSD conferred a small but significant risk of poor phonemic skills and spelling at the age of 5½ and of poor word reading at the age of 8. Furthermore, within the group with SSD, the persistence of speech difficulties to the point of school entry was associated with poorer emergent literacy skills, and children with 'disordered' speech errors had poorer word reading skills than children whose speech errors indicated 'delay'. In contrast, the initial severity of SSD was not a significant predictor of reading development. Beyond the domain of speech, the presence of a co-occurring language impairment was strongly predictive of literacy skills and having a family risk of dyslexia predicted additional variance in literacy at both time-points.CONCLUSIONS: Early SSD alone has only modest effects on literacy development but when additional risk factors are present, these can have serious negative consequences, consistent with the view that multiple risks accumulate to predict reading disorders.

U2 - 10.1111/jcpp.12648

DO - 10.1111/jcpp.12648

M3 - Article

VL - 58

SP - 197

EP - 205

JO - Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry

JF - Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry

SN - 0021-9630

IS - 2

ER -