By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Who comprised the nation of shareholders? Gender and investment in Great Britain, c. 1870-1935

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

Department/unit(s)

Publication details

JournalEconomic History Review
DateE-pub ahead of print - 18 Jun 2010
DatePublished (current) - Feb 2011
Issue number1
Volume64
Number of pages31
Pages (from-to)157-187
Early online date18/06/10
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This article explores the widening ownership of stocks and shares in Great Britain between 1870 and 1935. It demonstrates the extent of that growth and the increasing number of small investors. Women became more important in terms of the number of shareholders and value of holdings. Factors that encouraged this trend included the issue of less risky types of investments, and legal changes relating to married women's property. We examine the 'deepening' importance of stocks and shares for wealth holders, arguing that the growing significance of these kinds of financial assets was as important as the growth in the investor population.

    Research areas

  • WOMENS PROPERTY ACT, PORTFOLIO INVESTMENT, BRITISH, ENGLAND, OWNERSHIP, WEALTH, IMPERIALISM, RESOURCES, INVESTORS, SPINSTERS

Discover related content

Find related publications, people, projects, datasets and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations