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Work and home productivity of people living with HIV in Zambia and South Africa

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Work and home productivity of people living with HIV in Zambia and South Africa. / Thomas, Ranjeeta; Friebel, Rocco; Barker, Kerrie; Mwenge, Lawrence; Kanema, Sarah; Vanqa, Nosivuyile; Harper, Abigail; Bell-Mandla, Nomtha; Smith, Peter C.; Floyd, Sian; Bock, Peter; Ayles, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Hayes, Richard; Hauck, Katharina.

In: Aids, Vol. 33, No. 6, 01.05.2019, p. 1063-1071.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Thomas, R, Friebel, R, Barker, K, Mwenge, L, Kanema, S, Vanqa, N, Harper, A, Bell-Mandla, N, Smith, PC, Floyd, S, Bock, P, Ayles, H, Fidler, S, Hayes, R & Hauck, K 2019, 'Work and home productivity of people living with HIV in Zambia and South Africa', Aids, vol. 33, no. 6, pp. 1063-1071. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000002160

APA

Thomas, R., Friebel, R., Barker, K., Mwenge, L., Kanema, S., Vanqa, N., ... Hauck, K. (2019). Work and home productivity of people living with HIV in Zambia and South Africa. Aids, 33(6), 1063-1071. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000002160

Vancouver

Thomas R, Friebel R, Barker K, Mwenge L, Kanema S, Vanqa N et al. Work and home productivity of people living with HIV in Zambia and South Africa. Aids. 2019 May 1;33(6):1063-1071. https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000002160

Author

Thomas, Ranjeeta ; Friebel, Rocco ; Barker, Kerrie ; Mwenge, Lawrence ; Kanema, Sarah ; Vanqa, Nosivuyile ; Harper, Abigail ; Bell-Mandla, Nomtha ; Smith, Peter C. ; Floyd, Sian ; Bock, Peter ; Ayles, Helen ; Fidler, Sarah ; Hayes, Richard ; Hauck, Katharina. / Work and home productivity of people living with HIV in Zambia and South Africa. In: Aids. 2019 ; Vol. 33, No. 6. pp. 1063-1071.

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@article{d3998964c326473386d98eb558be2a49,
title = "Work and home productivity of people living with HIV in Zambia and South Africa",
abstract = "To compare number of days lost to illness or accessing healthcare for HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals working in the informal and formal sectors in South Africa and Zambia.Design:As part of the HPTN 071 (PopART) study, data on adults aged 18-44 years were gathered from cross-sectional surveys of random general population samples in 21 communities in Zambia and South Africa. Data on the number of productive days lost in the last 3 months, laboratory-confirmed HIV status, labour force status, age, ethnicity, education, and recreational drug use was collected.Methods:Differences in productive days lost between HIV-negative and HIV-positive individuals ('excess productive days lost') were estimated with negative binomial models, and results disaggregated for HIV-positive individuals after various durations on antiretroviral treatment (ART).Results:From samples of 19330 respondents in Zambia and 18004 respondents in South Africa, HIV-positive individuals lost more productive days to illness than HIV-negative individuals in both countries. HIV-positive individuals in Zambia lost 0.74 excess productive days [95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 0.48-1.01; P<0.001] to illness over a 3-month period. HIV-positive in South Africa lost 0.13 excess days (95{\%} CI 0.04-0.23; P=0.007). In Zambia, those on ART for less than 1 year lost most days, and those not on ART lost fewest days. In South Africa, results disaggregated by treatment duration were not statistically significant.Conclusion:There is a loss of work and home productivity associated with HIV, but it is lower than existing estimates for HIV-positive formal sector workers. The findings support policy makers in building an accurate investment case for HIV interventions.",
keywords = "absenteeism, economics, HIV/AIDS, informal sector, labour productivity, sickness days",
author = "Ranjeeta Thomas and Rocco Friebel and Kerrie Barker and Lawrence Mwenge and Sarah Kanema and Nosivuyile Vanqa and Abigail Harper and Nomtha Bell-Mandla and Smith, {Peter C.} and Sian Floyd and Peter Bock and Helen Ayles and Sarah Fidler and Richard Hayes and Katharina Hauck",
note = "{\circledC} 2019 The Author(s).",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/QAD.0000000000002160",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "1063--1071",
journal = "Aids",
issn = "0269-9370",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Work and home productivity of people living with HIV in Zambia and South Africa

AU - Thomas, Ranjeeta

AU - Friebel, Rocco

AU - Barker, Kerrie

AU - Mwenge, Lawrence

AU - Kanema, Sarah

AU - Vanqa, Nosivuyile

AU - Harper, Abigail

AU - Bell-Mandla, Nomtha

AU - Smith, Peter C.

AU - Floyd, Sian

AU - Bock, Peter

AU - Ayles, Helen

AU - Fidler, Sarah

AU - Hayes, Richard

AU - Hauck, Katharina

N1 - © 2019 The Author(s).

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - To compare number of days lost to illness or accessing healthcare for HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals working in the informal and formal sectors in South Africa and Zambia.Design:As part of the HPTN 071 (PopART) study, data on adults aged 18-44 years were gathered from cross-sectional surveys of random general population samples in 21 communities in Zambia and South Africa. Data on the number of productive days lost in the last 3 months, laboratory-confirmed HIV status, labour force status, age, ethnicity, education, and recreational drug use was collected.Methods:Differences in productive days lost between HIV-negative and HIV-positive individuals ('excess productive days lost') were estimated with negative binomial models, and results disaggregated for HIV-positive individuals after various durations on antiretroviral treatment (ART).Results:From samples of 19330 respondents in Zambia and 18004 respondents in South Africa, HIV-positive individuals lost more productive days to illness than HIV-negative individuals in both countries. HIV-positive individuals in Zambia lost 0.74 excess productive days [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48-1.01; P<0.001] to illness over a 3-month period. HIV-positive in South Africa lost 0.13 excess days (95% CI 0.04-0.23; P=0.007). In Zambia, those on ART for less than 1 year lost most days, and those not on ART lost fewest days. In South Africa, results disaggregated by treatment duration were not statistically significant.Conclusion:There is a loss of work and home productivity associated with HIV, but it is lower than existing estimates for HIV-positive formal sector workers. The findings support policy makers in building an accurate investment case for HIV interventions.

AB - To compare number of days lost to illness or accessing healthcare for HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals working in the informal and formal sectors in South Africa and Zambia.Design:As part of the HPTN 071 (PopART) study, data on adults aged 18-44 years were gathered from cross-sectional surveys of random general population samples in 21 communities in Zambia and South Africa. Data on the number of productive days lost in the last 3 months, laboratory-confirmed HIV status, labour force status, age, ethnicity, education, and recreational drug use was collected.Methods:Differences in productive days lost between HIV-negative and HIV-positive individuals ('excess productive days lost') were estimated with negative binomial models, and results disaggregated for HIV-positive individuals after various durations on antiretroviral treatment (ART).Results:From samples of 19330 respondents in Zambia and 18004 respondents in South Africa, HIV-positive individuals lost more productive days to illness than HIV-negative individuals in both countries. HIV-positive individuals in Zambia lost 0.74 excess productive days [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48-1.01; P<0.001] to illness over a 3-month period. HIV-positive in South Africa lost 0.13 excess days (95% CI 0.04-0.23; P=0.007). In Zambia, those on ART for less than 1 year lost most days, and those not on ART lost fewest days. In South Africa, results disaggregated by treatment duration were not statistically significant.Conclusion:There is a loss of work and home productivity associated with HIV, but it is lower than existing estimates for HIV-positive formal sector workers. The findings support policy makers in building an accurate investment case for HIV interventions.

KW - absenteeism

KW - economics

KW - HIV/AIDS

KW - informal sector

KW - labour productivity

KW - sickness days

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064239565&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002160

DO - 10.1097/QAD.0000000000002160

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 1063

EP - 1071

JO - Aids

JF - Aids

SN - 0269-9370

IS - 6

ER -