By the same authors

From the same journal

From the same journal

Working-Class Households and Savings in England, 1850–1880

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Working-Class Households and Savings in England, 1850–1880. / Perriton, Linda; Maltby, Josephine Anne.

In: Enterprise & society, Vol. 16, No. 2, 05.2015, p. 413-445.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Perriton, L & Maltby, JA 2015, 'Working-Class Households and Savings in England, 1850–1880', Enterprise & society, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 413-445. https://doi.org/10.1017/eso.2014.34

APA

Perriton, L., & Maltby, J. A. (2015). Working-Class Households and Savings in England, 1850–1880. Enterprise & society, 16(2), 413-445. https://doi.org/10.1017/eso.2014.34

Vancouver

Perriton L, Maltby JA. Working-Class Households and Savings in England, 1850–1880. Enterprise & society. 2015 May;16(2):413-445. https://doi.org/10.1017/eso.2014.34

Author

Perriton, Linda ; Maltby, Josephine Anne. / Working-Class Households and Savings in England, 1850–1880. In: Enterprise & society. 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 413-445.

Bibtex - Download

@article{1c2e3c06e0734fd2bcd1fd4172e71c0e,
title = "Working-Class Households and Savings in England, 1850–1880",
abstract = "The British trustee savings banks that operated throughout thenineteenth century were designed expressly for working-classuse, and solely to promote long-term saving. Despite the substantialnumbers and national spread of these banks, there have beenfew studies of their use by savers. Their neglect as a data source ispuzzling, given the extent of the surviving depositor records thatprovide long-run empirical data that includes savers{\textquoteright} identity,marital status, and occupation, as well as account balances andtransactions. Our preliminary work on four banks (Limehouse,Newcastle, South Shields, and Bury) shows results of significantinterest in understanding working-class financial behavior,including a substantial number of accounts opened and maintainedby working-class married women, accounts opened andrun by minors from earnings, and varied patterns of accountusage. ",
keywords = "Savings Banks, 19th century, England, financial management, working class households",
author = "Linda Perriton and Maltby, {Josephine Anne}",
note = "(c) The Authors 2015. Published by Cambridge University Press. This is an author produced version of a paper accepted for publication in Enterprise and Society. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.",
year = "2015",
month = may,
doi = "10.1017/eso.2014.34",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "413--445",
journal = "Enterprise & society",
issn = "1467-2227",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Working-Class Households and Savings in England, 1850–1880

AU - Perriton, Linda

AU - Maltby, Josephine Anne

N1 - (c) The Authors 2015. Published by Cambridge University Press. This is an author produced version of a paper accepted for publication in Enterprise and Society. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy.

PY - 2015/5

Y1 - 2015/5

N2 - The British trustee savings banks that operated throughout thenineteenth century were designed expressly for working-classuse, and solely to promote long-term saving. Despite the substantialnumbers and national spread of these banks, there have beenfew studies of their use by savers. Their neglect as a data source ispuzzling, given the extent of the surviving depositor records thatprovide long-run empirical data that includes savers’ identity,marital status, and occupation, as well as account balances andtransactions. Our preliminary work on four banks (Limehouse,Newcastle, South Shields, and Bury) shows results of significantinterest in understanding working-class financial behavior,including a substantial number of accounts opened and maintainedby working-class married women, accounts opened andrun by minors from earnings, and varied patterns of accountusage.

AB - The British trustee savings banks that operated throughout thenineteenth century were designed expressly for working-classuse, and solely to promote long-term saving. Despite the substantialnumbers and national spread of these banks, there have beenfew studies of their use by savers. Their neglect as a data source ispuzzling, given the extent of the surviving depositor records thatprovide long-run empirical data that includes savers’ identity,marital status, and occupation, as well as account balances andtransactions. Our preliminary work on four banks (Limehouse,Newcastle, South Shields, and Bury) shows results of significantinterest in understanding working-class financial behavior,including a substantial number of accounts opened and maintainedby working-class married women, accounts opened andrun by minors from earnings, and varied patterns of accountusage.

KW - Savings Banks

KW - 19th century

KW - England

KW - financial management

KW - working class households

U2 - 10.1017/eso.2014.34

DO - 10.1017/eso.2014.34

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 413

EP - 445

JO - Enterprise & society

JF - Enterprise & society

SN - 1467-2227

IS - 2

ER -