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You are what you eat? Meal type, socio-economic status and cognitive ability in childhood

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You are what you eat? Meal type, socio-economic status and cognitive ability in childhood. / Von Stumm, Sophie.

In: Intelligence, Vol. 40, No. 6, 01.11.2012, p. 576-583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Von Stumm, S 2012, 'You are what you eat? Meal type, socio-economic status and cognitive ability in childhood', Intelligence, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 576-583. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intell.2012.08.004

APA

Von Stumm, S. (2012). You are what you eat? Meal type, socio-economic status and cognitive ability in childhood. Intelligence, 40(6), 576-583. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intell.2012.08.004

Vancouver

Von Stumm S. You are what you eat? Meal type, socio-economic status and cognitive ability in childhood. Intelligence. 2012 Nov 1;40(6):576-583. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intell.2012.08.004

Author

Von Stumm, Sophie. / You are what you eat? Meal type, socio-economic status and cognitive ability in childhood. In: Intelligence. 2012 ; Vol. 40, No. 6. pp. 576-583.

Bibtex - Download

@article{cdc6a51338c744acae940bdcce2d07cb,
title = "You are what you eat? Meal type, socio-economic status and cognitive ability in childhood",
abstract = "The current study tests if the type of children's daily main meal (slow versus fast food) mediates the association of socioeconomic status (SES) with cognitive ability and cognitive growth in childhood. A Scottish birth cohort (Growing Up in Scotland) was assessed at ages 3 (. N=. 4512) and 5. years (. N=. 3833) on cognitive ability (i.e. vocabulary and picture similarities), SES, and the frequency of having slow and fast food main meals per week. SES was highly correlated at ages 3 and 5. years, while intelligence and the type of meal were only moderately associated across ages. SES at age 3 was positively related to ability at age 3 but not at age 5. The type of meals partially mediated the effects of SES on cognitive ability at ages 3 and 5, with more slow meals being associated with better cognitive performance. Furthermore, a higher frequency of slow food meals were positively related to cognitive growth between ages 3 and 5. years, after adjusting for SES and prior cognitive ability; however, they only accounted for a negligible amount of the variance in cognitive change. Overall, slow food was associated with better cognitive ability and cognitive growth in childhood, albeit corresponding effect sizes were small.",
keywords = "Ability, Childhood, Cognitive growth, Nutrition, Socioeconomic status",
author = "{Von Stumm}, Sophie",
year = "2012",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.intell.2012.08.004",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "576--583",
journal = "Intelligence",
issn = "0160-2896",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - You are what you eat? Meal type, socio-economic status and cognitive ability in childhood

AU - Von Stumm, Sophie

PY - 2012/11/1

Y1 - 2012/11/1

N2 - The current study tests if the type of children's daily main meal (slow versus fast food) mediates the association of socioeconomic status (SES) with cognitive ability and cognitive growth in childhood. A Scottish birth cohort (Growing Up in Scotland) was assessed at ages 3 (. N=. 4512) and 5. years (. N=. 3833) on cognitive ability (i.e. vocabulary and picture similarities), SES, and the frequency of having slow and fast food main meals per week. SES was highly correlated at ages 3 and 5. years, while intelligence and the type of meal were only moderately associated across ages. SES at age 3 was positively related to ability at age 3 but not at age 5. The type of meals partially mediated the effects of SES on cognitive ability at ages 3 and 5, with more slow meals being associated with better cognitive performance. Furthermore, a higher frequency of slow food meals were positively related to cognitive growth between ages 3 and 5. years, after adjusting for SES and prior cognitive ability; however, they only accounted for a negligible amount of the variance in cognitive change. Overall, slow food was associated with better cognitive ability and cognitive growth in childhood, albeit corresponding effect sizes were small.

AB - The current study tests if the type of children's daily main meal (slow versus fast food) mediates the association of socioeconomic status (SES) with cognitive ability and cognitive growth in childhood. A Scottish birth cohort (Growing Up in Scotland) was assessed at ages 3 (. N=. 4512) and 5. years (. N=. 3833) on cognitive ability (i.e. vocabulary and picture similarities), SES, and the frequency of having slow and fast food main meals per week. SES was highly correlated at ages 3 and 5. years, while intelligence and the type of meal were only moderately associated across ages. SES at age 3 was positively related to ability at age 3 but not at age 5. The type of meals partially mediated the effects of SES on cognitive ability at ages 3 and 5, with more slow meals being associated with better cognitive performance. Furthermore, a higher frequency of slow food meals were positively related to cognitive growth between ages 3 and 5. years, after adjusting for SES and prior cognitive ability; however, they only accounted for a negligible amount of the variance in cognitive change. Overall, slow food was associated with better cognitive ability and cognitive growth in childhood, albeit corresponding effect sizes were small.

KW - Ability

KW - Childhood

KW - Cognitive growth

KW - Nutrition

KW - Socioeconomic status

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84866288912&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.intell.2012.08.004

DO - 10.1016/j.intell.2012.08.004

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84866288912

VL - 40

SP - 576

EP - 583

JO - Intelligence

JF - Intelligence

SN - 0160-2896

IS - 6

ER -