Young hands, old books: Drawings by children in a fourteenth-century manuscript, LJS MS. 361

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Young hands, old books: Drawings by children in a fourteenth-century manuscript, LJS MS. 361. / Thorpe, Deborah Ellen.

In: Cogent Arts & Humanities, Vol. 3, 1196864, 29.06.2016, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Thorpe, DE 2016, 'Young hands, old books: Drawings by children in a fourteenth-century manuscript, LJS MS. 361', Cogent Arts & Humanities, vol. 3, 1196864, pp. 1-18.

APA

Thorpe, D. E. (2016). Young hands, old books: Drawings by children in a fourteenth-century manuscript, LJS MS. 361. Cogent Arts & Humanities, 3, 1-18. [1196864].

Vancouver

Thorpe DE. Young hands, old books: Drawings by children in a fourteenth-century manuscript, LJS MS. 361. Cogent Arts & Humanities. 2016 Jun 29;3:1-18. 1196864.

Author

Thorpe, Deborah Ellen. / Young hands, old books: Drawings by children in a fourteenth-century manuscript, LJS MS. 361. In: Cogent Arts & Humanities. 2016 ; Vol. 3. pp. 1-18.

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@article{0dd2380ae8aa43e59e74716abf6a1873,
title = "Young hands, old books:: Drawings by children in a fourteenth-century manuscript, LJS MS. 361",
abstract = "This article scrutinises three marginal drawings in LJS 361, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania Libraries. It first considers the provenance of the manuscript, questioning how it got into the hands of children. Then, it combines developmental psychology with close examination of the material evidence to develop a list of criteria to attribute the drawings to children. There is consideration of the features that help us estimate the age of the artists, and which indicate that one drawing was a collaborative effort between two children. A potential relationship is identified between the doodles and the subject matter of the text, prompting questions about pre-modern child education and literacy. Finally, the article considers the implications of this finding in both codicology and social history since these marginal illustrations demonstrate that children were active in the material life of medieval books.",
keywords = "medieval, Early Modern, interdisciplinary humanities, children, doodles, child, Manuscripts, drawings, PSYCHOLOGY",
author = "Thorpe, {Deborah Ellen}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2016 The Author(s).Uploaded in accordance with the publisher{\textquoteright}s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.",
year = "2016",
month = jun,
day = "29",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "1--18",
journal = "Cogent Arts & Humanities",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Young hands, old books:

T2 - Drawings by children in a fourteenth-century manuscript, LJS MS. 361

AU - Thorpe, Deborah Ellen

N1 - © 2016 The Author(s).Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details.

PY - 2016/6/29

Y1 - 2016/6/29

N2 - This article scrutinises three marginal drawings in LJS 361, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania Libraries. It first considers the provenance of the manuscript, questioning how it got into the hands of children. Then, it combines developmental psychology with close examination of the material evidence to develop a list of criteria to attribute the drawings to children. There is consideration of the features that help us estimate the age of the artists, and which indicate that one drawing was a collaborative effort between two children. A potential relationship is identified between the doodles and the subject matter of the text, prompting questions about pre-modern child education and literacy. Finally, the article considers the implications of this finding in both codicology and social history since these marginal illustrations demonstrate that children were active in the material life of medieval books.

AB - This article scrutinises three marginal drawings in LJS 361, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania Libraries. It first considers the provenance of the manuscript, questioning how it got into the hands of children. Then, it combines developmental psychology with close examination of the material evidence to develop a list of criteria to attribute the drawings to children. There is consideration of the features that help us estimate the age of the artists, and which indicate that one drawing was a collaborative effort between two children. A potential relationship is identified between the doodles and the subject matter of the text, prompting questions about pre-modern child education and literacy. Finally, the article considers the implications of this finding in both codicology and social history since these marginal illustrations demonstrate that children were active in the material life of medieval books.

KW - medieval

KW - Early Modern

KW - interdisciplinary humanities

KW - children

KW - doodles

KW - child

KW - Manuscripts

KW - drawings

KW - PSYCHOLOGY

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23311983.2016.1196864

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 1

EP - 18

JO - Cogent Arts & Humanities

JF - Cogent Arts & Humanities

M1 - 1196864

ER -