By the same authors

From the same journal

Young people with high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome planning for and anticipating the move to college: what supports a positive transition?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Young people with high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome planning for and anticipating the move to college : what supports a positive transition? / Mitchell, Wendy Ann; Beresford, Bryony Anne.

In: British Journal of Special Education, Vol. 41, No. 2, 06.2014, p. 151-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Mitchell, WA & Beresford, BA 2014, 'Young people with high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome planning for and anticipating the move to college: what supports a positive transition?', British Journal of Special Education, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 151-171. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8578.12064

APA

Mitchell, W. A., & Beresford, B. A. (2014). Young people with high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome planning for and anticipating the move to college: what supports a positive transition? British Journal of Special Education, 41(2), 151-171. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8578.12064

Vancouver

Mitchell WA, Beresford BA. Young people with high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome planning for and anticipating the move to college: what supports a positive transition? British Journal of Special Education. 2014 Jun;41(2):151-171. https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8578.12064

Author

Mitchell, Wendy Ann ; Beresford, Bryony Anne. / Young people with high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome planning for and anticipating the move to college : what supports a positive transition?. In: British Journal of Special Education. 2014 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 151-171.

Bibtex - Download

@article{2712259efabd499682b2c1c18f3c81b9,
title = "Young people with high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome planning for and anticipating the move to college: what supports a positive transition?",
abstract = "For many young people in England, the move into continuing education involves a transfer from the school where they were educated to a further education college. For those with high-functioning autism or Asperger's syndrome, this can be a challenging process. Past research has demonstrated some of the problems that these young people can encounter. This article adds to the evidence base by describing how best to support these young people, focusing specifically on 'young person endorsed' practice. Data are gleaned from qualitative interviews with 18 young people with high-functioning autism/Asperger's syndrome. Findings reveal that young people welcomed the involvement of practitioners, however, specific forms of help and knowledge were particularly valued. In addition, it was parents, as opposed to professionals, who typically emerged as the most significant and valued source of support. Implications for practice are discussed, including the support needs of parents.",
keywords = "AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS, TRANSITION, ASPERGERS SYNDROME, COLLEGE",
author = "Mitchell, {Wendy Ann} and Beresford, {Bryony Anne}",
year = "2014",
month = jun,
doi = "10.1111/1467-8578.12064",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "151--171",
journal = "British Journal of Special Education",
issn = "1467-8578",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Young people with high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome planning for and anticipating the move to college

T2 - what supports a positive transition?

AU - Mitchell, Wendy Ann

AU - Beresford, Bryony Anne

PY - 2014/6

Y1 - 2014/6

N2 - For many young people in England, the move into continuing education involves a transfer from the school where they were educated to a further education college. For those with high-functioning autism or Asperger's syndrome, this can be a challenging process. Past research has demonstrated some of the problems that these young people can encounter. This article adds to the evidence base by describing how best to support these young people, focusing specifically on 'young person endorsed' practice. Data are gleaned from qualitative interviews with 18 young people with high-functioning autism/Asperger's syndrome. Findings reveal that young people welcomed the involvement of practitioners, however, specific forms of help and knowledge were particularly valued. In addition, it was parents, as opposed to professionals, who typically emerged as the most significant and valued source of support. Implications for practice are discussed, including the support needs of parents.

AB - For many young people in England, the move into continuing education involves a transfer from the school where they were educated to a further education college. For those with high-functioning autism or Asperger's syndrome, this can be a challenging process. Past research has demonstrated some of the problems that these young people can encounter. This article adds to the evidence base by describing how best to support these young people, focusing specifically on 'young person endorsed' practice. Data are gleaned from qualitative interviews with 18 young people with high-functioning autism/Asperger's syndrome. Findings reveal that young people welcomed the involvement of practitioners, however, specific forms of help and knowledge were particularly valued. In addition, it was parents, as opposed to professionals, who typically emerged as the most significant and valued source of support. Implications for practice are discussed, including the support needs of parents.

KW - AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS

KW - TRANSITION

KW - ASPERGERS SYNDROME

KW - COLLEGE

U2 - 10.1111/1467-8578.12064

DO - 10.1111/1467-8578.12064

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 151

EP - 171

JO - British Journal of Special Education

JF - British Journal of Special Education

SN - 1467-8578

IS - 2

ER -